What is 3D GameLab?

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  • This reply was removed on 2011-04-27.
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    More on GameLab...

    I'm Chris Haskell, co-inventor of the system. I think what you'll find is a revolutionary approached to learning. The system takes what ever curriculum you choose and makes it a game. The tool adds game layers including experience points, leveling, awards, achievements, and most importantly student choice. As you'll see in the screenshot below, participants choose from pools of activities (quests) that interest or inspire them. They receive experience points for completing them and work toward a condition where they can WIN your class.



    Your curriculum can be added (see below) by a simple interface for designers (teachers) or added by searching quests built by other users in the system. All content at this phase is CC licensed (Attribution). You can create whatever you want.



    Let me know if this answers some of your initial questions. Also, feel free to fire follow-up questions as more stuff pops into your head.
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    3D GameLab is a quest-based learning management system designed to turn a classroom or learning group into a living game. Teachers and students are able to login, design, and choose quests that are tied to standards. Learner progress is tracked in the system, players have ranks, titles, awards, and achievements. Teachers are able to run reports on student progress.

    All users can accept and complete quests. To design quests, however, you must first complete a quest chain that teaches you how to design quests in the GameLab LMS. Quests can incorporate an infinite variety of learning activities such as games, simulations, virtual worlds, social media, or any activity in the physical world, creating a meta-gaming experience for the players.

    Teachers can create their own groups, and all activity in the group is private and can only be viewed by group members. This creates a safe learning space, especially for younger students. Older students will enjoy creating their own groups and quests on particular topics of interest, providing them ownership in the learning process.

    3D GameLab begins closed beta in August 2011. To join our interactive summer camp for teachers and instructional designers only, sign up at http://3dgamelab.org.

    In the fall, our beta will continue forward and integrate social networking capabilities, including friends and messaging, inside the game.
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    You noted that you have the Core Curriculum for the middle/high school learners loaded into the format. Is there a plan to include the core curriculum for elementary school students? I teach 2nd grade and I am interested in the Game Lab format, but am curious as to how many primary grade teachers would participate. I'm just finishing up with an online Teaching with WebQuests course and most of the participants were high school/college instructors.
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  • Hi Maureen,

    We'll be incorporating all Common Core standards in the system. In the quest design interface, where you'll be creating quests for your own classroom, you can choose from a drop-down menu showing common core standards, or fill-in-the-blank if you want to add another standard. Hope that helps.
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