Creative Suite for Linux (Thread #2)

  • Idea
  • Updated 1 month ago
  • Not Planned
This thread is a continuation of this idea: Produce Creative Suite for Linux

Due to the high volume of emails that was being triggered by the original thread, we've closed the topic to new conversation. Please continue your conversations about Creative Suite for Linux here.

Thanks for your understanding!
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Caty

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Posted 2 years ago

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Adobe, given the amount of interest in Creative Suite or Linux and the recent developments in commercial software for the Linux platform, why haven't you guys brought the Creative Suite to Linux?

Valve and the Humble Bundle are throwing more weight towards Linux gaming, and a big part of that is A/V work. Unless Adobe wants to surrender the burgeoning amateur and professional A/V markets for Linux users entirely to competitors and lose a lot of money, it should reconsider and announce Linux builds of the entire Creative Suite right away.

However, Adobe's recent announcements regarding Linux support on Adobe Flash and Reader leave me worried. Adobe seems to be systematically killing off Linux support for various products it makes. I wonder if Adobe is willing to totally cede the growing Linux user market...
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Phil Clayton

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The fact that this request is no further down the line 2 years later and Adobe is silent on the issue speaks volumes.

Maybe everybody interested in getting this to Linux should set a deadline?
Either Adobe commit to developing a version by ... or as a community all interested in this we should mass migrate away from Adobe CS and invest our time, effort and money in products like notepad++, scribus, inkscape, gimp, pdfforge, flash develop.

Would that be feasable to get some kind of collaboration going between all current projects to effectively create a suite out of the software?

I'm a web designer and my biggest strength is UI design. I could also create a site with a clear idea of the potential plan for an open source creative suite?
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Rodrigo Polo

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"New research from Yankee Group and Skyhook finds that Apple users download six times more paid apps than do Android users."
http://www.yankeegroup.com/about_us/p...

Yep, this article was from a year ago, and it shows that 1/4 of the developers for Android are concern about piracy.

@Sam Gleske is totally right about the "about" menu, iOS just as it is OS X is based in many open source projects and in some cases it use free software not-modified libraries.

Just to be clear, the points I showed are more the way I think Adobe analyze the situation, I use to be an Adobe Community Manager and I decided "quit" because Adobe has decided to "Stop giving away certifications" and many other incentives, I was promoting the idea of developing Adobe Air apps using the Air SDK and free software, sadly Adobe dropped Air, adn then change the licencing on Flash so developers have to may if their app is a popular one, craziness, so it looks like they have no interest so far in making (expending) something under Linux.
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Asgrim

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Android and iOS users both have Linux. How is that relevant? You are talking about a mobile platform which has a different ecosystem entirely.

What you've said about Adobe clearly proves my previous comments about Adobe being money grabbing; so yes, I would love to see a kickstarter to create a viable alternative to Photoshop (and the rest of the CS).
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Jim Pearson

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Hi, had an interest in this thread some time ago and although I understand the android and apple battle, I have always noted that the Humble Bundle games pack has shown Linux users in a positive light as far as donations for games is concerned:

http://inatux.com/?r=humble-indie-bun...

It appears that the majority of people on this thread will pay for software, as I myself would, if it was a requirement for my work or home, so whether they bring it out or don't there will still be a steady increase in Linux desktops and perhaps at this stage a port of the Mac version would be feasible and therefore profitable.
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Rodrigo Polo

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Nice, I bought a MacBook Pro Retina Display and then I paid the monthly fee of $50 (aprox) for Adobe Creative Suite 6, I know OS X is not Linux but most of the projects I run on Linux I can have them on OS X with MacPorts or Homebrew so if money is not a problem then try something different than Linux (again, thinking the way Adobe could see the issue)
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Asgrim

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What the hell is this? 1 million emails is nothing, how is this even an issue? People know if they don't want emails they can unfollow the thread but still have a +1, so clearly the majority were interested in watching the discussion and triggered many (including me who +1ed the thread ages ago) to actually participate. All this is doing is squashing our voice and I wouldn't be surprised if very few peope to bother to continue (although I'd love to be proven wrong!). Now a mere 13 people (at this time) can participate in the discussion at this time instead of several thousand.

I wouldn't be surprised if Adobe had asked/paid GS to do this to shut the public up. Outrageous.
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LookingMan

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Agree. I don't understand the decision. Just what if this thread will grow the same too? Will you close it and create Creative Suite for Linux (Thread #3) ?
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Sam Gleske

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Asgrim and LookingMan make a great point. Gee, I wonder how the #linux-kernel mailing list is able to generate several million emails *daily* I might add? Or for that matter any development mailing list. The system should be restructured if what you say is actually true.
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msdobrescu

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The second thread it's a good way to know how many of the original posters are still interested. Maybe if they would react on this too, would mean it's time to re-analyze the linux market. Who knows?
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Don Robertson

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I opened my mail this morning and found hundreds of mails from the thread. There must be a future for me in politics because I have no recollection of signing up to this thread. Must have done so sometime in the past.

Anyway - switching it to another thread was a good idea or I would have another hundred or so to get rid of.

Like to see Adobe port products to Linux but don't need a lot of email about it :-)
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mandraagora

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I could be mistaken Asgrim, but my guess is that the problem had to do with server resources that are required to send such a large number of emails. While I do not know who GS uses to host this site, I am sure they are limited by the resources on the (I assume dedicated) server the site uses. 1 million emails may not seem like much, but in reality, it can add up quickly in terms of bandwidth & cpu usage.
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djooooo

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Any Adobe Manager to explain why doesn't support Photoshop and CS programs on linux ? What they need to develop it ?
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albremer

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"Due to the high volume of emails that was being triggered by the original thread, we've closed the topic to new conversation."

Are you saying your system can not even handle a topic with 10,000 followers?

I guess you can only get satisfaction on this platform if you are a small group.
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Mikko Kumara

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Guess it's time for an "Adobe creative suite for Plan9" thread then.
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Raul G.T

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As readed in previous thread, Kickstarter can be used to see economic interest from the people; if games projects are getting some millions there, I don't see why Adobe would not try it at least.

Adobe can set the minimum amount needed for the project...and if reached, then great for everyone.
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AG

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exactly
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DougEfresh

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Adobe is multi-billion dollar company (worth $18 billion according to one site). Why would they need to do a Kickstarter? It seems to me if they wanted to put their software on Linux, they could. Hitting the community up for more cash seems like it would be sleazy, at least in my opinion.

I'm not trying to be a wet blanket here, but I don't understand...
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Raul G.T

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As I said, to see the economic interest, I mean the market out there.
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mandraagora

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My thoughts exactly. 2012 was the most profitable year on record for Adobe! They don't need community fundraising & it would be an abuse for them to use kickstarter or any other crowdsourcing methods.
They could port their products over to Linux without even using up a millionth of 1% of their "pocket change"!
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AG

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just the huge amount of interest for this thread, shows the potential & need for this = an open goldmine to start something new what people really want.

to diss adobe a bit: not like they did whit Flash Catalyst or other Software where are not really usefull and people dont want at all ;-)
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Chris

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Adobe should take a look at these two threads and take a fucking hint already.
This must be the most active topic on this site.
People obviously want adobe's products on Linux.
And of course I agree with them.
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airetamstrm

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A Linux version would level the OS playing field considerably. This is really needed, and really overdue.

Adobe, you have alot of power in this industry, and that doesn't come without certain responsibilities. You're not owning up to these responsibilities well at all.

Look anywhere- you'll see tons of "I'd switch to Linux, but [Photoshop / Flash / CS5]"... These people have made an investment in your product and don't want to sacrifice that. Second- there is a huge web developer base on Linux- at least way more than you probably acknowledge- that could use additional convenience tools.

There are way more than enough web development shops (actual businesses ready to pay money) out there running Linux desktops to warrant this. Way more. There are also plenty of end users waiting for things like Elements on Linux, as proven by these threads.

And yet, you're forcing your userbase to pick between one bad option or a worse one for operating systems. Let me see.. if I was going to pick between a $3000 Mac that can run CS and Maya, or $1200 for equivalent hardware running Linux and $1800 to actually buy software with, I'd pick the latter. Hands down.

Not to mention with the Windows 8 disaster trying to force sheeple into a console user interface, market place and walled garden mindset is repulsive enough already.

Adobe, own up. You owe the World, CS for Linux. For Solaris. For BSD. You OWE that. Get it done, even if you have to crowd fund it. We'll open our wallets- TAKE OUR MONEY!
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Chris

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That was an perfect message!
You should send it to the guys at adobe, because I'm not so sure they even know about this thread.
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msdobrescu

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Adobe history shows they've started with Apple/MacOS stuff. They are bound to Apple. They don't care of our choices in matter of OS-es. If you really think you cannot live without Adobe products, chose one of these two, Windows or MacOS. They made this joke, they have chosen a place where we could cry and they could ignore us. There are about 80% of Windows, 9% MacOS and less than 5% has Linux. And there are hundreds of distros of Linux in that small 5%. Adobe won't go to linux, invoking a superfluous argument that linux is too fragmented. What is Linux? It's a kernel and it's not heterogenous at all. There are drivers available for almost everything. Mostly free. What makes a distro? The bunch of software around the kernel (a DE - desktop environment, a package manager, a constellation of apps). Having some specifications, for the libraries and the compiler used to build a software (like CS suite) it's easily to have them installed. So you know what to get to make a software run (not even compile it, just install it). I have installed deb packages, or rpm packages on my Sabayon without a problem which uses a different approach of these two. They could make the proper scripts for free if Adobe would release CS for linux and the users request them. Some major sowtware developers have stated the distros for their stuff (like Oracle). But Adobe doesn't need our money. They don't care about their responsability for linux users, because they have none. And the Windows "disaster" it's an overstatement. It could be made to behave like 7, and people still buy it. It will probably eat double memory, but that would not stop its users using it, the inertia is too strong.
And stop complaining here, let's find a more direct approach.
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Sam Gleske

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@msdobrescu: What would you define as a more direct approach? Should all of us spam Adobe's help website and forums for Linux versions? Should we keep opening topics through their feedback forms ignoring their pleas for us to keep our discussion in a single getsatisfaction thread (which they closed btw)?

How can we possibly be any more direct short of walking up to the CEO and punching him in the face?

I don't know. This just sounds like bureaucracy to me.
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msdobrescu

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Well, some e-mails from time to time could be better, maybe once a year... just to remeber there is a bunch of people willing to step to another platform.
Here, it's clear, nothing happens. No official response was given since the first one in the thread#1, if I remember well. What's the point of this thread then? Some feed-back from Adobe would be good, as the thread come back to life these days...
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airetamstrm

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I imagine the person that posted the initial thread was grilled by their superiors. We still want and are still waiting for this to happen, and Adobe has knowingly, willingly, ignored this. Ignored.

There are no statements from anyone outside of public relations on this issue in response to this clear and overwhelming demand.

We're on the brink of Linux as a major gaming platform (finally!), sure Adobe can see this coming. My choice in OS has nothing to do with my willingness to pay for applications- most of my applications are free, which is great. But if someone can provide a better, easier, more flexible, more stable application that can do more, I'm certainly willing to pay for it.

As is almost everyone who truly wants to see Linux succeed.
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msdobrescu

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Come on, please use a civilised language!
Do you expect Adobe taking in account people using 'f*ck' and other similar words or expressions?
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Chris

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Are you autistic or something?
Dude, it's a word. Okay? Get over it.
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msdobrescu

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LOL!
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Sam Gleske

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We could simply email the CEO found by googling "adobe ceo email"

http://ceoemail.com/us-companies.php

I'll tell everyone what this isn't about.
- It's not a technical issue. They already compile on a Unix platform (FreeBSD/OS X based).
- It's not a userbase issue. There's more than enough proof to prove there's profit in the Linux market even without untold numbers of users switching. We pay for software and do every day. Period.
- It's not a conflicting license issue. Any non-lawyer can see that the GNU GPL doesn't restrict proprietary applications from running on the Linux platform or using library/api calls.
- It's not because there are many distros. Each distro has something in common. The Linux Kernel. If a binary works with the Kernel then it will work on any variant of "distro". Providing a simple installer *.sh or an archive of binaries *.tar.gz would suffice to support every distro. If this wasn't possible then there would be no proprietary software for Linux at all nor a market to make money (and that's not the case).

So the real question is what is it? Why are they not willing to build for the Linux platform?

Is it because Adobe has a partnership with another company and are paid not to build for Linux? Fine, then say it but don't beat around the bush.

Is it because of the claim of additional support costs for officially supporting Linux? Fine, release and unsupported version which you won't take calls on at all. Communities will form and even niche support companies will support your company. If anything you would be able to claim job creation around those support companies since you don't offer the support.

Stop being stone silent and make a statement already.
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DougEfresh

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It is disappointing to see this thread started over from scratch. The last one had over 13k likes...

Anyway, I'm certainly still interested in this. Linux is it, and until I have Adobe programs there, it can't be my work OS. After over 12 years of using Photoshop, and roughly 10 years with other Adobe and ex-Macromedia programs, I don't want to learn something else. Not to mention our printers often ask me for PSD source files, and Indesign preflights are also sometimes required. Even if I was willing to learn something new, there is no alternative in my line of work. This is the standard.
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Don Robertson

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And that is why Adobe won't port to Linux. Adobe don't care if you switch OS - so long as you still buy Adobe software. And they don't care if you *have* to use an OS you don't like - so long as you are still buying Adobe software.

The only reason for Adobe it port to Linux is if they are loosing sales, but "there is no alternative ...."
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DougEfresh

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So you're suggesting people stop upgrading? That's not really a feasible option for most professionals. Especially if you're out in the job market. Companies want you to know the latest and greatest in most cases so telling someone you're still using Photoshop 5.5 is just silly, and will most definitely not land you the job.

I only upgrade every other version or so since the recent upgrades have been incremental. True it's the end result that matters, but time is money and if something can be done much more efficiently in a newer version, then yes I will upgrade.

Adobe basically has the market cornered. Feel free to boycott upgrades, but know it's not something we can all do. I can only hope Adobe listens to the voices of it's customers. In the meantime I'll wait for a real alternative to rise up and take some market share.
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msdobrescu

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What about an online petition?
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Chris

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And what do you call this?
Besides, petitions doesn't work. They never do.
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Larry McCauley

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An online petition would attrack the ire of the gimp enthusiasts as well as the ire of the open software purists. That's OK, as they, like me, are entitled to an opinion. Mine is that ultimately, solutions will be pragmatic. Practicality dictates action.

With this in mind the paid app culture on open source is established in some areas (vmware) but not in others. But it can easily fit in alongside an open source eco system, especially when the apps raise the open source OS profile to the sky, as a ported CS would.

The theory that open source equals an economic anarchy is historically untrue; as well as being the current idiocy that masks itself as assumption in those too comfortable to broaden their horizons and offering significant value to their customers. Porting CS to Linux would be one heck of a factor in my creative life; it would free customers from paying for their OS's and renewing the OS licenses for however many machines they are using. This creates more funding for more resources, such as more Adobe products. Too my untrained eye it looks like a no-brainer, a win-win situation.

Recent statistics actually show that Linux users are willing to donate twice as much for software (the 'hunble indie game bundles') than their Windows counterparts. So much fot the 'open software users are leeches' theory.

Adobe made one hell of a step in the right direction by making their apps rentable by the month. This showed flair, innovation and a desire to put the customer first whilst making a profit for itself. If that same, flair, that same daring can be applied to porting CS to Linux, then the frustrations of designers the world over would be over. if that last statement seems trite, remember the last thread on this subject generated 13,000 replies and a million emails. I hope this thread goes even better.

I am well cheesed off with being tied to Windows when a far superior OS is available for nothing. An OS that increases and enhances worklow, not get bogged down in a myriad of running third party security processes...which is another extra cost for the Windows designer.

Times are hard. Seems Adobe are doing rather nicely with CS, though...

Please Adobe, just port the bloody thing.
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msdobrescu

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I think Gimp is to PS what VirtualBox is to VMWare.
I think there is no other suite as CS, especially PS. I'd prefer Inkscape over Illustrator, but Illustrator is the standard. Generally, now, any other foss tool is suitable for professional use, except for PS/LR. These are the fittest in their domain. I talk about image definition and subtle tweaks, details, where they are best.
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Larry McCauley

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Agreed.
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Don Robertson

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I used to prefer Freehand ... I find Inkscape a bit flaky. What I would really like is InDesign. Scribus is a bit flaky as well.
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Omar Naveed

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Are you waiting for Corel to release its creative suite for Linux? You still have some chance Adobe.
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Jack Saunders

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The lack of CS suite availability for Linux is the only thing left that is keeping me running a windows machine at home and work
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Phil Clayton

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Yeah, me too. It's so frustrating to be stuck with a bloated, unreliable OS. I want to be using Ubuntu.
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Andrei Khitrov

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I wouldn't like to malign Adobe. Especially because of their good products. But I accept that Adobe may get some fees from Microsoft so that they ignore Linux platform.
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airetamstrm

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I'm pretty sure someone else spelled it out in terms of money and RoI- if Adobe gained even 5,000 customers, it'd more than pay for the actual port- it'd pay the salaries of ten extra developers for nearly 10 years.
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Andrei Khitrov

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@airetamstrm
My point was that those gained 5,000 customers will already be Adobe's current ones. Because, those who absolutely need Adobe's products have to already use them on mac or windows even if they absolutely like having a linux port. Those who don't need Adobe's products will not likely to widely use them having they a linux port. Actually it is not obvious that linux port will give Adobe real amount of new customers. And I'm afraid that it's the point of view of Adobe's managers.
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Asgrim

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@Andrei I disagree. What about those who use alternative products on Linux that would buy Adobe products were they available? They would all be new customers.

Plus if, hypothetically, the Linux version was a massive success, everyone who uses the Windows or OSX versions might change to Linux and they could focus on just the one product, haha. Yeah, unlikely, bite me ;)
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airetamstrm

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@Andrei

For one, I don't think the existing customer base who already purchases Adobe products, and would move to a Linux build should one come out would be a measily 5000. I imagine this would be a far bigger number. When I say 5000, I mean 5000 new sales, of new copies not yet purchased by that particular customer.

Second- 5000 new customers because of a new platform (extremely popular one at that) is a very small number and honestly? I'm confident the Linux userbase waiting for this can beat that number. One of my initial arguments on this topic is- it isn't really even about sales to begin with. That's settled - Adobe can reach profit with a Linux version, period.

My argument is that it is Adobe's responsibility as a technology leader to make this port happen- as it will allow for fairer competition in the OS marketplace and level the playing field. Adobe should be proud it has such a strong position in the marketplace- but it also needs to be a responsible company. Why consumers don't demand, let alone even expect this from big corporations puzzles me.

Noone seems to have addressed this one yet.
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Andrei Khitrov

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@airetamstrm

> Adobe's responsibility as a technology leader to make this port happen

I would be happy if Adobe would think the same way. And yes, my respect towards Adobe would leap up if they would make this step. But I'm afraid it is not that sort of companies. I am saying it in reproach to Adobe.
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rishi sadhir

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If Adobe were available on linux, you would have one customer right here.
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jn.norlin

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I would buy adobe for linux!
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Chris

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Come on, Adobe.
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headsign

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To be honest: as much as I'd love to free myself from the tight clutches of both major OS companies Apple and Microsoft, I would just as much love to do the same with Adobe. Sadly, the open source alternatives to CS products are far from what OpenOffice (or LibreOffice) is to MS Office.
The sad situation is that we creative professionals are at the mercy of the companies which develop our tools and there is hardly any real choice or alternatives, which leaves us begging at their feet, hoping that they will kindly care for our causes. The sad truth is they won't.
What we should think about is maybe to fund projects that will pay developers to build some valuable alternatives for us. Just like Apple, Adobe will continue to focus on advancing towards the office and entertainment sector because there's much more money to be earned there. It's just natural and there's really nothing we can do about it. Time to work on some alternatives, in my opinion.
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Don Robertson

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Yes - fund inkscape and scribus.
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Don Robertson

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Many people say they will not switch to Linux because they need Adobe Creative Suite. Adobe won't port to Linux until they think they will loose sales.

What we should do is tell Adobe you will not upgrade until you can upgrade to a Linux version. The version you have is good enough. We cannot do without it - but we can do without new features.

I have an old version of InDesign that I use on XP - mostly I use Kubuntu. I won't be upgrading to a new version for Windows, but I would buy a new version for Linux.
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Todd Kopriva, Employee

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I can only answer for the After Effects team, but here is what we said on this topic a year ago, and it still stands:

"After Effects for Linux: A lot of us on the After Effects team wish that this were more feasible, but the truth is that it just isn’t realistic in the foreseeable future. Porting an application to another operating system, and then testing, maintaining, and supporting it on that OS is a tremendous amount of work. We just haven’t been able to make a business case for being able to fund that tremendous amount of work given the size of the likely return on that investment. We are still looking into this, but we want to be honest and let you know that it isn’t likely to happen soon."

This was one part of a response to about a dozen of the most common feature requests for After Effects:
http://blogs.adobe.com/aftereffects/2...

Note that in the intervening time we've only been able to get to less than half of the requests that come before a Linux port for After Effects in our prioritized list. It's a lot of work, and so are a lot of other things that we get asked for even more.

Let me stress again that one of the very large factors is testing: testing on another OS adds a very large amount to our work, and that is often the prohibiting factor for a lot of feature decisions.
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LookingMan

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Oh, come on.
Bringing to market... Linux market already wants your product, show and it will take whole market.
Testing... Just develop something, throw it to the community and community will gladly test FOR FREE (just be ready to handle bug reports).
What is the real reason?
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Asgrim

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Todd - no-one is disputing it would be a big task. I'm a programmer so I know what you mean. We are asking why aren't you doing it though? Adobe could probably hire a huge team of dedicated Linux developers, testers and support staff within a few months and get to work on it. I've already pointed out that Adobe makes a huge profit, and releasing a Linux version would just generate more profit.

Apps like Adobe Air failed on Linux because it's free and closed. The revenue stream for a free app is always going to be limited. The costs for ongoing support, updates, testing, bugfixing etc. outweigh the benefits.

This isn't Adobe Air though. Photoshop CS6 costs roughly £660 plus just under £180 per upgrade version. If you sold a Linux version for the same amount, Adobe is going to profit. Even if Adobe's net costs are £10 million a year, it only has to sell 15,000 new (non-upgrade) copies of Photoshop alone each year to ensure break even. If the costs are £20 million, it's still only 30,000 copies needed to break even. The numbers add up, it makes sense. At the prices Adobe sell products at, there is no possible way there wouldn't be the RoI.

Airetamstrm - I agree, but Adobe are highly unlikely to release their numbers to the public.

LookingMan also has a point. Why not "crowd-source" testing and basic support?
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airetamstrm

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@Asgrim:

Without numbers, he's basically declaring that anyone who has made (conservative, in my opinion) cost estimates is naive. While that clearly isn't his intention- I don't think its appropriate for him to make such a remark without clarifying specifically how this impacts Adobe's potential for a Linux port.
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Sam Gleske

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There are ways to automate testing. If your testing is largely a manual process then something needs to be automated. Robots can click buttons too.

I don't know about anyone else but I'm a large installation sysadmin and I know the costs of the development pipeline and supporting systems. Sure, you'll have to train a phone support team on installation issues but the usability of the software will be the same.
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Chris Caldwell

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none of this is neccessary. Just make it run under WINE like many non-cloud versions did. Nothing official, nothing needs support lines. Just put up an unofficial blog post by some employee's cousin on 'how to install CC via WINE' and let it leak. That alone will get you a LOT of subs back. Its dirty, but 1. Linux folks are used to it and dont mind working for it a bit 2. its a 'dipping the toe in' solution that lets you see just how big your linux userbase would be.

I know I know, 'you dont make a program work with wine, you make wine work with a program', except thats not strictly true. Many programs work with wine natively, or can have small modifications made to make it do so. Also, perhaps contribute to WINE to make approach it from the other end?

All in all, seems like a much lower cost route, and a way to get subs back and some data without putting your official name on it.
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Matthew Edward Markham

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Well, I honestly feel sorry for Adobe when a "alternative" pops up somewhere....Right now people "need" Adobe, but eventually it'll become the thing of the past...It's like whatever though. It's not my company, it doesn't hurt my feelings.
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Sam Gleske

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A company is not human. It doesn't have feelings. Do you feel sorry for it when it fires people?

Business is dog eat dog. If they're too lazy to provide the product I'd gladly see them tank in the wake of someone else keeping up with the times.
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Aboubakr Seddik Ouahabi

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Well, knowing that Adobe has known about this thread 2 years ago, yet they chose not to do anything, then I strongly believe that someone should try to provide an alternative, at least for the products most wanted like DreamWeaver and PhotoShop.

I'm a web-developer myself, and CS6 works fully on Linux via the latest WINE release 1.5.11 or .08 (just tried it yesterday), and it has resolved the issue of the messed up characters, and I would like to have it running natively on Linux or something similar.

What I'd like to suggest here instead of saying we should fund a project while we're not doing it, is to call just 3 more programmers, and we set up a plan, and start producing a solution, and when we can show something, we put it to the community to judge and to allow them the chance to fund it via a kickstarter if they like what they'll see.

I'm doing web-programming languages right now, but I don't mind diving into C/C++ with my old background, and I'd add that we should use Qt-Creator, which will result in a cross-platform native standalone binary piece of Software where the source code will be in reach for everybody else to fork or improve. So, if anyone is interested, then let's get in touch, set a plan, share the roles, and get started. We'll need a UI designer as well, and we can borrow code from the already existing IDEs and use the already invented technology and polish it to something better plus adding the missing features from DreamWeaver.

I might be overwhelmed right now and just over ambitious, but no doing anything = not getting anything either, and giving it a try won't hurt me, so I don't mind spending my spare time on such a project, especially if there are other guys willing to collaborate and motivate each other.

Again, sorry for not getting involved with other projects if you want to suggest that, as to my knowledge most of the Alternatives out there are Java-based like Aptana, NetBeans, Eclipse...etc and they lack a lot of what DreamWeaver can provide for web-developers. And I believe compiling to a native machine-code is way better and faster than compiling into any sort of byte-code.
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headsign

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That would be great. Unfortunately, I guess that it will be a lot of work. Probably more than a loose community of voluntaries can handle. Adobe was so smart not to let to themselves happen what happened to Microsoft when Word Perfect went open source and became OpenOffice: they put the lid on the only achieved concurrent products on the market. Without such a product as a base, as much as I love and admire open source and the idea of a community of voluntaries, I don't think this would be possible without some serious funding.

Possibly, some crowdfunding project could be the solution.
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Aboubakr Seddik Ouahabi

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It doesn't need more than 3 serious programmers to get you something relevant, as long as rational expectations are targeted for a fresh project, not to forget setting a relevant timeframe as well, and I'd say a year of work would be still very lacking, but if there is a continuous commitment from everybody, there'll be good results for sure.
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Nature Shade

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I whant to start a project like that.http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12...
shomthing like this wold probely be great for a frame to begin with.
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Aboubakr Seddik Ouahabi

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I'll keep you in my radar, so if you succeeded in gathering a team, then count me in :)

The Auto-complete feature is available in many Open-Sourced software, thus exporting/importing/porting it to a new tool should be easy to a certain degree depending on the heaviness of the used libs of the software you want to borrow the code from.
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Nature Shade

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I have started a simple site for this http://wenty.tk/