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MPK2 Series - Preset editor?

Actually, the MPK2 Mini or MkII has an editor, but why not MPK225, 249, 261? Like seriously, the longer I have this keyboard, the more I'm starting to see how much Akai dropped the ball, ridiculously! It would've been better to leave the MPK as is but just add the new pads, slap on the 2 & release as MPK2 series. I'm starting to feel frustrated, upset, let down, & downright ripped off! How could they digress/downgrade when moving up to the next series? I think these keyboards (when people have had them long enough to compare with original series) will be Akai's undoing as far as MIDI Keyboard Controllers, people are going to stray from them, which is ridiculous, because they came out strong with original MPK series & things could've exploded for them, but they really dropped the ball. My mind is boggled, I can in no way find any logic in why they would remove any of the features, workflow ability, manuals, support etc that the original series had. Unless they do something to change this, I see no other outcome, I know for me, I will not continue with Akai for controllers, I'm out $1000 for something that I could've had exact same, no, BETTER features with a $200 M-Audio Oxygen(even has DirectLink-Auto-Map) & BETTER software (MPC Software-not Essentials) with MPC Studio for $300 and saved $500 & been actually happy with Akai and my equipment. Ahh Man, sry, I'm ranting, anyway, why is there no Editor? The cheap tiny little Mini got an Editor, why not the Big Expensive MPK261?
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  • Hi Nate,

    Sorry you are having trouble with this.

    The MPK2 series does not require an editor because the same features are editable, and able to be stored, directly on the keyboard. Personally, this seems a lot easier to me than worrying about connecting the board to an editor, or worrying about running another piece of software on your computer just to edit the functions of the hardware.

    I can't think of any features that may have been included with an editor that are not included in the 2 series keyboards. You can even store programs on your computer by sending the sysex data and saving a file with software like midi ox. Was there something specific you were looking for?
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  • Hi Dan,


    I have a rack synth and I would like to control specific parameters in the rack that I can only control with Sysex. How do I edit my MPK 261 to be able to control with one of the Drawbars a specific Sysex message?


    Thanks
    • You can't. The MPK261 does not generate any sysex through its controls.
    • The MPK2 can't do it by itself, but if you've got a PC or Laptop in the rig you can find software such as Bome MIDI Translator that would convert regular CC messages into the sysex you need.

      If you happen to use Cubase, it has a pretty robust set of features for controlling MIDI gear via sysex and automating it all (support for legacy instruments in Cubase is pretty outstanding). I.E. You can build a profile for the kit in Cubase, and have graphical sliders/knobs/buttons in Cubase for the unit. Next you could assign controllers to automate those Cubase generated elements using quick controls or generic remote maps. Other leading DAWs may well have the capability as well.

      You might also find legacy MIDI patch bays for the rack on Ebay that can do it, and these days I'm pretty sure people have built things for 'adrino/raspberry' and/or smartphones/tablets. Again, these would use software similar to Bome to translate simple CC messages that the MPK2 CAN send, into the sysex messages demanded by your outboard kit.

      Before buying anything you might not already have at hand.....investigate if you can tweak the patches in the outboard gear first! Sometimes it's far easier to just build alternate patches/performances/presets on the outboard unit itself and use a simple MIDI program change to swap between them. Also, deeper down in a particular instrument patch, you can often assign things to simple controllers (I.E. a filter control or envelope parameter can often be set in the patch itself to respond to a single CC event of your choice).
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  • Just another MPK2 user's perspective:

    The MPK2 doesn't really need a proprietary slate of OS dependent 'configuration' software that the likes of Microsoft and Apple will undoubtedly break at some point (ultimately enraging thousands of consumers as they wait on fixes from AKAI that might never come [heck, they'll be making totally different models by then, and the engineers that put the MPK2 together may well be long gone and working somewhere else doing other things] for a unit that worked perfect for at least a decade but suddenly got broken).

    Just as an example....Roland refuses to update drivers for their famous Fantom series to easily install on Windows 10. We're out here trying to 'hack together' our own USB drivers so we can keep using otherwise GREAT music kit! So, I'm glad AKAI has chosen to make the MPK2 more 'timeless' by making it use generic USB/MIDI drivers and upgrading the firmware and onboard memory to be more independent from external apps.

    It's quite easy to edit everything on the MPK2 itself. We can store the presets individually or in a single bank via simple sysex dumps. Individual presets are very small and quite easy to work into DAW buttons or even automation lanes. With a little research we can even find ways to manipulate the actual sysex preset data for interesting array of control over things like which preset slot gets written, and swapping light colors on the fly.

    After three years of daily use, I personally find it far easier to tap a few buttons on the MPK2 and keep presets in my DAW, along with the specific project it goes with...than to mess with side apps. In fact, with a DAW, it's pretty common to simply keep one universal preset/mapping on the MPK2, and have an unlimited number of 'software based' presets in the DAW itself. I.E. Without changing a thing on the MPK2 itself, I can change around between configurations that use the MPC pads for things like arming/disarming tracks, doing step time entry in score editors, and triggering instruments. The flexibility of the MPK2 presets themselves are simply 'gravy' for many alternate workflows in the average DAW setup.

    The main thing that really should be addressed in MPK2 firmware is support for foot pedals that have 'stomp off' instead of 'stomp on' switches in BOTH of the on/off style foot-switches. Many of the best pedals ever constructed use switches that are 'closed' when at rest, and 'open' when stomped (True Piano style pedal systems). I'm still a bit disappointed that even though there are plenty of workarounds...after years, AKAI has chosen NOT to do this simple firmware update. Otherwise, it's been a very solid board for the money that's quite playable and has some pretty nice software/plugins with it.

    As for 'frustration'.....I don't think you'll find any musical instrument (acoustic or electronic) on the market that's totally free of these. There will always be something out there that might seem like a better fit for your style or workflow, but at the end of the day it's important to settle in and use what you've got at hand to make music. The eternal pursuit of the 'perfect gear' that's 'cheap', 'easy to use', and 'never breaks' is quite trendy and never ending.

    Try not to let it distract you from MAKING MUSIC. Instead, ask questions, and if you can't sort it out after a reasonable amount of time...work around it and just keep PRODUCING MUSIC. Some of the best albums ever produced were done with total 'junk' for kit/equipment. Many of us still remember a day when a simple compressor/limiter unit and a 4 track cassette deck cost more than a brand new economy car!

    Master the instruments, rather than being slaves to them.

    So, what exactly are you trying to do with the MPK2 that you could 'do better/easier' with the MPK? Personally, I'd much rather tap 3 buttons on the MPK2 and be done with it, and have the ability to automate everything from ANY DAW or Sequencer than have to 'launch some exclusive proprietary application' that might not even provide 'hot-key' or MIDI remote options, and fiddle around in it with a mouse.

    The MPK was good for the money, and in my opinion, the MPK2 is even BETTER.
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    I found this thread because I was searching for the MPK249 software editor so I could check it out before I purchased and some of the responses in here are hogwash. My MPD232 has a software editor and that unit is basically the MPK249 minus the keys and wheels and adding a sequencer. It is SOOOOO much easier to design a preset in the software editor than clicking through long menus on the tiny LCD display on the hardware. I can set all pads to specific on/off colors at one time and in each of the 4 pad banks in about 30 seconds. It would take a solid 15 minutes to do this through the hardware. Not to mention setting note values across all pads in one shot, setting CC values across all controllers in one shot, etc. How are you supposed to do these things quickly on the MPK249 without a software editor? How are you supposed to modify arpeggios? I might have to reconsider this keyboard...
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    I think editing on the keyboard is very time consuming. It is a bit silly that there is no software editor:/
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  • Same question here, just surpriced that this high level keyboard does not have an editor and all other toys do have !!!
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