26 year old scared to death, needing top denture

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I am 26 years old, within the last 3 years my teeth have deteriorated EXTREMELY bad, especially the top ones. It is so crazy how fast this has happened, I never would have dreamed at 26 I would be facing having dentures. I have put it off as much as I can and tried not to think about it, but how can I? I am waking up of a morning and spitting out pieces of my teeth :(. So needless to say I have to do something.

One small problem...

I am the most terrified person in the world of the dentist..

Im not your typical everyday scared person either, I have nightmares about having dental work. Im so crazy about my mouth I will not even let my wife touch me around my mouth, I am even skeptical about putting eating utensils in my mouth, the only reason I do is because I have to. I have had three dental procedures in my life, an extraction and 2 fillings. I handled the extraction and first filling okay, but the second filling really did it for me, I almost jumped out the window in front of the chair into the river with half a tooth in my head. I cannot handle dental work.

What I would like to have done is have all my top teeth extracted, my bottoms are not that bad, I only need 2 pulled in the back on the bottom, and just a top denture put in.

Here is my questions:

1) Will a dentist put me under (anesthesia), extract my top teeth (and the two on bottom, 17 teeth in all), and have my top denture back in before I wake up? I cannot be conscious and have all my teeth pulled out, this will traumatize me severely and I refuse to, all my teeth will rot out before I go through with it conscious. Sedation is no good for me seeing as how the last filling (the one where I almost jumped out the window) I had, I took two 1mg Xanax before going to the appointment, didn't even phase me.

2) What can I expect as far as how they feel in your mouth and pain wise. Is talking and eating hard?

Guys I will be honest, I am absolutely terrified. I nearly have a panic attack just thinking about going to do it. Anything anyone has to offer I will gladly take. Thank You!
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Brandon Chastain

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  • Scared

Posted 6 years ago

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Patricia

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I am 26 also and just got top dentures less than 2 weeks ago. My tops were done for like yours so it took me a few years to mentally prepare to have dentures. Having 14 teeth pulled at once scared me so I opted for the sedation. I took a pill the night before and one an hour before the appointment and they have me some when I got there to and the last thing I remember from that day until I woke up at home. I have been out under to get all of my teeth young when I was younger and I know some specialists do that so it is an option but so you know would probably be an out patient surgery/procedure in a hospital. At least that is how mine was. On that one I remember going into the operating room and told to count to 100. Nothing after that. Pain level now after getting so many pulled was not as bad as I expected and I can tell you it depends on the dentist. I have some root canals done that don't hurt at all afterward and some I have to take pain relievers on the clock for pain management. I took Tylenol and ibprophen for this procedure and after a week I no longer needed it. Talking was hard at first as well as eating but after my first denture adjustment they feel more comfortable in my mouth and I can tak a lot better. I hope all this helps you make you decision. I am glad that my top teeth are not there causing toothaches anymore and that was what helped me get through it. The thought of no more pain. Good luck!
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Brandon Chastain

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Do you remember what the name of the drug was they sedated you with?
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Jayelle

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I've heard they use Halcion
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Sue

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You aren't alone. I was one of the most terrified people ever to get the rest of my upper teeth removed. I wore two partials for years. But due to disease my teeth became so soft they would literally break in my sleep. Some pressure may be felt with upper molars. It is very comfortable, but your dentist should allow you to raise your hand and stop for a moment and use a rocking motion to remove the tooth. Some are not in the bone really all that deep because of the loss of bone so you may not experience this at all. But if you are very afraid then you must like and trust your dentist. And have a very good relationship with him or her. Someone that puts you at ease. If they don't, then switch dentist. Check out the dentist before you go. Not all are very understanding of your normal fears.

But I will tell you wearing an upper is not as bad as I thought it would be, before you speak, swallow and learn to press your tongue up against your upper and swallow to remove any excess saliva. Or before you swallow food, this is a very good tip I learned from others. Because it ends at the vibration line, in the roof of your mouth it may make some people gag. But they can make a tiny adjustment to this without causing you to loose all the suction but not too much. Never let them cut it so much too far away from this soft pallet/hard pallet line or the denture will become too lose and always need too much adhesive. You need that suction to fit properly.

If you are determined you will wear them it is easier everyday. Don't take them out the first several days as your gums heal, this helps a great deal so you will adjust.

And repeating a prayer and trusting in someone bigger than me, helped me not have to have drugs to get through the awful fear I was feeling during having them removed. I even broke it up into several visits so I could manage my fears. It is helpful If your dentist understands just how nervous you really are and willing to work through those fears with you.
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Dr Robert Allen

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Immediate dentures are done every day in dentistry. Often a general dentist will take impressions, the dental lab will fabricate the denture while you still have your natural teeth; someone trained in oral surgery or dental general anesthesia will put you to sleep, extract the teeth and place the new denture into your mouth. When you awaken. it is all done. I am not an oral surgeon, but have completed hundreds of similar procedures uneventfully using oral sedation, a local anesthetic (in the dental office, while awake) . The sedation controls the fear. The procedure is safe and predictable. When general anesthesia is used the procedure is more risky and therefore more expensive than any other way.

In many cases the general dentist keeps the denture...immediately after the teeth have been removed, the patient returns to the general dentists officer where he inserts (without pain) the completed denture. There are many variations on the way this can be done for you.

A retired dentist in Hampton VA
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Brandon Chastain

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Can you tell me some of the risks with general anesthesia?
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Mary

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Dr. Allen, you talk about having impressions made before the immediate dentures are done. I don' have any (top) molars (just my 6 front teeth). Can they make impressions "based on"/that will fit with my lower (have them all!) teeth?
thank you for you time and compassionate posts to those here.
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Dr Robert Allen

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Brandon: most dentistry is done in the dental office with local anesthetics(injections). The cost is much less expensive than done in a hospital operating room. Also putting a person asleep with general anesthetic chemicals is dangerous in any location= even hospitals. Local anesthetic are VERY safe and easily administered. Every year we have new, better, more effective local anesthetic at our disposal. Local anesthetics give profound numbness (many types of novocaine are now used). Every year, deaths occur from deep sedation and general anesthesia in the dental office. Just this month, early Jan 2014, a child died from sedation administered by mouth in a dental office in Hawaii. Light sedation and use of Nitrous Oxide (laughing gas) is available in many dental offices and makes the visit more comfortable.

Anyone administering general anesthesia has many different kinds of chemicals to use. The anesthetist (person putting one to sleep) will use a gas or sedative that he is most experienced and comfortable using.

MARY: You may the most rewarding type of immediate denture. With all the molars and bicuspid gone, the gums all healed in those back areas are ideal . The dentist and lab technician will have no trouble matching the uppers molars with your existing lower natural teeth, the healing is fast. Only you and your dentist will know that you have had new teeth made. The teeth can be made to look exactly like your present remaining 6 natural front teeth.

Good Luck, Dr Bob Allen, Hampton VA
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Ruidoso Bill

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The dental office where I had my extractions used what is called conscious sedation with a iv, I was slightly aware but no pain and after eight hours remember nothing. He also offer laughing gas but I chose to sleep through it.
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Jayelle

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Glad to know not all dentists insist on general anesthesia, my dentist explained that it makes it easier for them. Yea, I think I'll have to pass on the medically induced coma.
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Dr Robert Allen

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Dentists & physicians worldwide use local anesthetics to perform surgery. There are virtually NO allergy to Lidocaine, Septicaine and Carbocaine...Carbocain must be used carefully in young children as they do not metabolize the drug rapidly. Allergyj to antibiotics is a serious problem and can lead to anaphylactic shock--and death. Over use of antibiotics is a growing problem and the bacteria we re killing have learned to become resistant to the effects of anitbiotics.

If you would like to learn more about that growing problem view the Frontline program on your computer:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontli...

Treatment in hospital or office using GENERAL anesthesia (putting one to sleep) is virtually taking one to a near death level...thus one of the adverse effects of general anesthesia gone wrong is Death.

No one wants to deal with that issue.

Dr. Allen
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Jayelle

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Thank You Dr. Allen, they acted like I was being silly when I said,"No Thanks" to GA and I'd look for a dentist who used conscious sedation.
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Dr Robert Allen

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You are in the driver's seat. Dentistry is becoming a consumer business vs a dedicated profession. I grew up wanting to serve the needs of the patient ....long lasting fillings and crowns...improving the education of the patient to prevent future dental problems....The New Dentistry is dominated by making money as quickly as one can, catering to the perceived needs of the patient. Retire before the patient discovers your fraud !!

The adverting industry is successful because it "creates" a need in the mind of the consumer. If the ad industry is successful in convincing the consumer they must have a product or service, then they are successful. The industry hides behind the favorable image that they are educating the public about things???

Consumers (including medical and dental patients ) must learn to become better consumers.

Consider the food supplement industry: over the counter medicines, ointments, rubs, vitamins, etc. Medical researchers have found no connection between taking all that crap and improved health.

How about all the complex pharmaceuticals on your tv daily. "ask your doctor is XXXXXXX" is good for your problem Hell, I cannot even write the names of each. How can a medical doctor practice objective medicine with the patient making pharmaceutical recommendations he has seen on TV?? Prescription drugs should be banned from T V advertising--FDA has a job to do that.

The internet HAS definitely helped us all become better informed consumers...this blog is a perfect example. IF my wife and I need information we go directly to the internet: to Places like the Cleveland Clinic site...and so on.

You are in the driver's seat. You must ask questions of your health provider. When you are satisfied, that you know enough, then you can make the decision to take the medicine, the treatment , or whatever. You control .....the doctor does NOT control. IT IS YOUR LIFE__YOUR BODY --YOUR DECISION. Good LUCK

dr. A