I was told it takes a year for the bone to regrowhave questions before ordering dentures?

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I don't understand this system
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Frederick Kirby Burns

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Posted 2 months ago

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Barbara G

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please explain what your  question is??
what is it that you do not  understand??
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1Spicy!

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Unfortunately, bone does not regrow, or regenerate.  Otherwise.........
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Positivity

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Hi there,  who ever told you that once your teeth are removed, that the jaw bones will regrow is wrong! Once your teeth have been removed, and your gums have healed, your jaw bone will start shrinking, not regrowing. This is because your teeth are no longer insitu, to stimulate that biting action, so that the jaw bone can't maintain it's shape.  That is why when you get dentures, because of the bone shrinkage, your dentures start to become loose.  Then you need to start getting them soft lined, hard lined, or use adhesives so that your dentures can stay in place better.  After immediate dentures (if you have them already), once your gums/bone have shrank enough, then you can get your permanent dentures made.  These dentures will be a better fit, as your gum/bone have already significantly shrank, not regrown.  The shrinkage continues over your whole life time once your teeth have been removed.  I hope this has helped you.
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1Spicy!

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Maybe he meant heal, instead of regrow, because he mentioned a year and that is generally how long they tell you it will be until you replace your temporary set of dentures with your "permanent". 
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Kathy P

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The bone that the teeth sit in in your mouth is called the alveolar bone.  The jaw is the only place in the body in which this particular bone is situated and it is there purely for holding the teeth. Once the teeth have gone, there is no reason for the body to hold on to the alveolar bone so it gradually disappears.  Once it has gone, there will be no further loss so, in effect, if you wait until it has all gone before your dentures are made, they will fit exceptionally well. Most people would be reluctant to wait that long, for obvious reasons, which is why, if you have dentures made before the bone loss is complete, you will usually need to have them relined now and again.
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Barbara G

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Kathy P
If you get some   implants   the bone will think they are your real   teeth and will not go  away
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Kathy P

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Yes, I understand that but I was just commenting on the bone itself because I was under the impression that the original poster was asking about waiting for a year before ordering dentures and was thinking that the bone would regrow which, of course, it won't;  it will disappear instead.  If there is chance that he could have implants, he would need to arrange to have the necessary work done soon after the teeth have been extracted. A year would be too long if he needs to keep the alveolar bone for implants.  If he doesn't go for implants, then leaving the gums to settle for as long as possible would ensure that dentures would fit well.   

I was a dental nurse  for many years but my practice didn't ever deal with implants so it's a field I know little about.  We would simply refer patients to an implant specialist.  We dealt with NHS and low-income patients only and implants would be beyond their budgets.