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Limit about T225x

Hi,

Do you know the limitation about T225X Gateway :
- Number of instruments ALIN connected with a gateway
- Number of blocks passing through the gateway

Thanks in advance
Philippe
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  • Bryan (Customer Support Engineer) May 13, 2015 12:44
    The first limitation is 60 connections through the T225X. A connection is consumed when another node (T2750, PC etc.) starts caching blocks from another node on the ALIN side. One or more blocks cached from the same node uses the same connection to exchange data between the end nodes, so you only use 1 connection per cached block connection to another instrument. So you could have 2 servers on ELIN and 30 ALIN instruments.

    You also consume a connection when you query the filing system of the instrument, but this connection is brief.
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  • Thanks Bryan

    And do we have a limitation in number of blocks exchanged?
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  • Bryan (Customer Support Engineer) May 13, 2015 15:42
    The second limit you ask about is the number of blocks you can cache through the T225X. There is no direct limit on block counts for the connections through a T225X, rather the limit relates to the number of messages through T225X. This side of the limit is down to the CPU power available. The connection count is a hard limit, the CPU limitation is harder to judge as this is not a hard limit being dependent upon use. For example, a T640 talking to PC through a T225X is likely to use far less power than a T103 to T2750 would because there will typically be far fewer messages (data) being transacted. The T225X has a powerful CPU so can take a lot of load, far more than a T221 could.

    It depends upon what is cached and what data is being exchanged as to how many messages per sec will be required. A message might be, multiple blocks of data or multiple writes. Where the maximum loading of T225X is exceeded, you can consider using an additional T225X to give greater capacity if there is a high message demand.

    Could you share a network topology diagram?
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  • Bryan (Customer Support Engineer) May 21, 2015 13:27
    To determine the connections (not message) loading of a T225X, you need to view the LLC_DIAG block in the T225X within LINtools. (Note: the block will be named LLCD_XX where XX is the T225X node number in hexadecimal (02, 1E, etc.)



    The T225X has two network connections (ALIN and ELIN) and each has an LLCport diagnostic view. In the LLCport field change the 0 to 1 to view the other. SAPs may be consumed by blocks cached from T225X diagnostics so users must check both LLCports.

    There is a limit to the number of connections available through the T225X (note the SAPsfree and SAPsbusy counts will sum to the total available count). One or more blocks cached to and from the same pair of nodes reuses the same connection to exchange one or more blocks of data between the end nodes. This usage shows a connection is bi-directional. You will use more connections when transferring files and sending commands to instruments, but these connections are closed once the data has been transferred and so the connection (SAP) use is transitory.

    You should expect to have some SAPsfree in a well balanced system.
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