Help get this topic noticed by sharing it on Twitter, Facebook, or email.

How do I make siblings visible in family tree?

I am new to this website, and still figuring things out!
Now I'm wondering how I can make the siblings (mine, my parents, etc.) visible in the family tree! Right now I only see the my parents, their parents etc... I added children to the page of my grandpa, but i can only see them listed when I click "children" under his name..

Help!
1 person likes
this idea
+1
Reply
  • Welcome to the community supported forum for FamilySearch. Every discussion thread is read by a FamilySearch representative, who may or may not respond as their time permits. We patrons have varying degrees of knowledge and experience and do our best to help each other with concerns, issues, and questions.

    First, FamilySearch FamilyTree will display deceased persons. When you enter the tree for the first time, you will need to enter yourself as a living person, and then enter any living people who are necessary to connect you with your deceased ancestral lines.

    Only you will be able to see those persons who are living and who you have entered yourself.

    Now as to using Family Search, I like to recommend the Family History Guide http://thefhguide.com/. Unless you are also a beginning genealogist (novice or newbie are two good terms that fit and everyone was there at some point in their life), then quickly going through the material on that site will help. Novices and Newbies would benefit from the exercises, and sometimes all it takes of people with more experience, is to just read through their exercises.

    If you are new to the site, then there is a significant difference between this site and the majority of sites that deal with family history, such as ancestry -- there is only one tree, not a bunch of separate site. It is a collaborative site, in which anyone can edit the tree and its contents. Because it is fully public, the only living people anyone can see are those they enter themselves. That because laws of privacy prevail and being and international site, the most rigid laws are observed by the developers.

    There are several ways to see the children of any couple. On each person's page, there is a section called "Family Members."

    The person (on whose details page you are looking at) appears as a parent on the left side in bold and a child on the right side. In this case, the "preferred" parents's children are shown when you open the page. To see the children of the other marriage, you click on the down arrow, which then shows the children of that marriage.


    Here the same child is shown twice (#1). Next to each child is an edit icon (#2) which also appears for the couple (parents). By clicking on the edit icon, a flyout will appear.


    Here you see only part of the flyout, but this is for the preferred couple and here you can see that the father is listed as guardianship (there is a story behind this particular situation that explains what happened).



    Here you see the same child's flyout for the top couple and can see that the father in this case is biological.

    That is on the person's details page. The Family Members screen shows the immediate relationships.

    The next response deals with the pedigree charts.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. happy, confident, thankful, excited sad, anxious, confused, frustrated kidding, amused, unsure, silly indifferent, undecided, unconcerned

  • To get to a person's pedigree chart, under the person, there is a pedigree icon View Tree. When you click on this area, the view shifts to a view of the person in the tree. Again, it is from the perspective of the preferred couple, but in this case, we are looking at it from where the person appears as a parent (the left side of the Family Members section)

    You can click on the above to enlarge it. To return to this discussion use your browser's back function.

    Here, the person is the focus person of the landscape view of the tree. Remember her preferred parents? They are listed as her parents here in the tree.

    There are several areas to piont out. First, there are four different views and are controlled by the drop down where it says Landscape (upper left corner of the view. The options are Landscape, Portrait, Fan Chart, and Descendancy.

    You may notice some color icons. The display of these icons is controlled by the drop down where it says "Options" (upper right corner). Here you can select which icons you want to see -- they deal with hints (ancestry's little "leaf"), research suggestions (which I have turned off), data problems, and several view options -- I have marriages checked because I want to see the marriage information for each couple. (If you are a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, then you will see information regarding Temples -- these are ecclesiastical in nature, and non-members using the site will not see them).

    Where multiple marriages are involved, such as with Nora's parents, there will be a down arrow next to the parent(s) with whom Nora (as a child) is associated.


    Here you see the list of fathers... If I click on Andrew Brown, Nora's biological Father, then a card will appear providing us with Andrew's basic information from his details page.


    Most of these links can be displayed in a new tab or window by right-clicking on the link. Here there are two -- the tree link will show Andrew as the focus person, and the Person link will show Andrew's details page.

    By the way, each person has what is known as a PID (Person ID) number, which is expressed as XXXX-XXX and is shown under Andrew's name -- his PID is K2JT-CVP.

    You've already seen part of a person's details page. I want to see him and his ancestors, so I'm going to click on Tree.


    Now Andrew's children with his wife Elizabeth Jane Clark are displayed to the left and their ancestors are displayed to the right. Not much has been done with Andrew's parentage because of that long story -- but there are hints on his flyout. He is said to have died in South America. The story is that he deserted his family and after almost 8 years, Elizabeth remarried and had addtional children, Nora Brown was either adopted or something by Elizabeth's second husband and raised by him. I haven't researched that part of the family, and need to do so.

    The symbols pointed out in the screen can expand the pedigree to show the grandchildren, etc., on the left and additional ancestry on the right by pressing the symbol.

    In the next response, I'll take a look at the other pedigree views.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. happy, confident, thankful, excited sad, anxious, confused, frustrated kidding, amused, unsure, silly indifferent, undecided, unconcerned

  • There are four views, which I mentioned at the beginning of my last response.


    We have been looking at the landscape view. When you change the view, the system will remember the last view you used so the next time you open a tree view, it will use that view.



    This is the portrait view. The big thing to remember in this view is that the ancestry of only one person is shown, but the children of the couple are shown with icons that will extend their information down and the ancestry lines up. I'm going to change focus to Elizabeth, Nora's mother, which will be more meaning for the Fan Chart.



    This is still the Portrait view, but you can see the ancestry of Elizabeth as well as her children with Andrew. Note that I have no option to select Elizabeth's second husband -- that option only exists in the Landscape view.


    Note there are only five slots for the children of the couple. By clicking on the arrow, I can switch husbands....


    All five slots are now filled with Edwin's contribution to the family -- the three from Elizabeth's first marriage and his own children with her. The arrow next to the husband will go back to the previous marriage. The arrow next to the fifth child will shift the chart to the next person in the family.

    The next response deals with the descendancy chart, which is what you are likely interested in seeing.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. happy, confident, thankful, excited sad, anxious, confused, frustrated kidding, amused, unsure, silly indifferent, undecided, unconcerned

  • This view starts with the focus person (now Elizabeth) and her husbands and children. The arrow icons will either expand or collapse the children. Pressing on any person's name will display the flyout for that person, just as it did with the pedigree chart(s).



    Several things on this chart are worth noting.

    First, the focus person is at the top of the chart. Each spouse is shown with the children with that spouse (step, adopted, biological, etc.)

    Just above the focus person is "Expand" and pressing on this produces a flyout with a bare-bones pedigree of the focus person's ancestry. You can shift the focus to one of those people at this point.

    Next to the word "Descendancy" where you can select one of the other views, are Generations with 1, 2, 3, and 4. This is where you select the number of generations to display. The opening view is a mix of 1 and 2 generations.

    The + next to each person's name will expand that person to their next generation descendants.

    The following views are for each of the four generations and what you would see if you expand. Note, no living persons will be displayed, again, laws of privacy prevail, and because of that, these views from one of Elizabeth's ancestors.

    Archibald is the son of my immigrant ancestor, so these shots are of my family. It is fairly complete, but some work still needs to be done.








    Feel free to browse around with these views. There is a lot to discover about working with a collaborative tree. My next response deals with changes that people make what I have found works for me.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. happy, confident, thankful, excited sad, anxious, confused, frustrated kidding, amused, unsure, silly indifferent, undecided, unconcerned

  • The massive tree that makes up FamilySearch FamilyTree is an open-edit collaborative tree. There is no collection of individual trees and everyone works from the same tree. As such, people come into the site with various levels of knowledge and experience. That is why I recommend The Family History Guide, because it helps even experienced genealogists understand more about this site (and others) and has experiments that help a newbie to the site learn how it works.

    Because it is open edit, changes can be made by every patron, Those changes can adversely impact what a previous patron has entered and actually apply to someone else, other than the person they made the changes to.

    In addition, the site was set up with the results of previous iterations of the site as the basis and it included at lot of duplicate entries. With people often living in the same area for a number of generations (even centuries -- my paternal line has been in this country for just over 300 years and relatives still live where my immigrant ancestor settled. They had many children and the families tended to marry and reuse the same names over and over. Thus, it is easy to get confused and merge the wrong person with another person, which creates a mess and unless a person has a lot of experience in the area, that happens far more often than any of us like.

    To minimize the changes, there are several things that I have found to be effective.

    1. I make sure every person I work with on FSFT is fully sourced with citations that can be used to locate the original record, not only with sources from FamilySearch Historical Records, but also from other sites as well as material that may not be available online. I also add whatever stories exist about that person and provide sources for those stories. The more information I can include, the less likely someone will come along and make changes.

    I make sure that every conclusion (fact) that is in a person's record actually applies to that person and I have included my reasoning why that conclusion is the right one. Remember, there is no room for speculation, which is not fact. If I am unsure about some aspect of a person's life, I put that information on the person's page in notes, discussions, or even as a story, especially if an old well-worn family tradition is involved.

    2. Every time some one makes a change or merge that I feel is incorrect, I use the FamilySearch message system to leave them a kindly written message as to why I feel that what they have done does not apply to that person. If they have not provided a source or a reason, I try to remind them that sources are crucial to establishing conclusions and facts, and that a person's reasoning is needed to let others know what research and thinking was done to reach the conclusion.

    3. I am prepared to not receive a response from the person. They have the choice to respond or not respond. I try to always thank them for adding sources, making corrections, and helping reduce the number of duplicates. If I had to clean up the record, I let them know what I have done, along with the reasoning behind my corrections.

    4. I am well aware that not everyone works with FSFT every day or extensively, so there are many different levels of knowledge being applied. I try to help others understand things like the differences between primary and secondary sources and that published family and locality histories often contain errors and are not sourced. I let them know that unsourced material needs to be treated as hints, not as facts.

    By taking an active part in working with a few of my relatives, I have found that bad changes either stop, or slow considerably. To track what changes take place, especially with critical persons in the tree, I put them on my watch list.

    The most gratifying part about taking an active role, I receive thanks from those who made changes, especially since I go into great detail about what I know of the person and their immediate family, the area, and the families who were neighbors to our common relatives.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. happy, confident, thankful, excited sad, anxious, confused, frustrated kidding, amused, unsure, silly indifferent, undecided, unconcerned

  • That's it for now. My wife is getting a bit lonesome, so I'm going to join her for the rest of the evening.

    Enjoy the site and feel free to ask questions in this forum, or look through the recent discussions to see what people have asked about or have responded with.

    FamilySearch is most heavily used on Sunday's so some responses are going to be slow and may even generate an error message. Refreshing your browser often takes care of the error message and everything is back to the way it should be.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. happy, confident, thankful, excited sad, anxious, confused, frustrated kidding, amused, unsure, silly indifferent, undecided, unconcerned