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jugalibus should be included in the Latin word list, translated as yoked together.

jugalibus should be included in the Latin word list, translated as yoked together.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/619...
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  • This reply was removed on 2018-07-08.
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    Which Latin word list? There are about a gazillion of them online.

    If you mean the one in the FamilySearch Wiki (https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/...), then take advantage of the fact that it is a wiki: ask for editing rights and add it yourself.
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    In context, it means a married couple. The more common term in church and other records, in my experience, is conjugibus (akin to the English word conjugal).

    Thankfully, Latin words are now relatively easy to find on the internet, once you have deciphered the script, which is very often abbreviated (a tradition left over from Classical Latin dating back a couple thousand years). It is also sometimes necessary to spot variations due to classical versus medieval spellings -- and in this case, the first letter needs to be handled as an I, following the classical usage, as is usually done in dictionaries! Thanks to the "Wiktionary" on the internet, well indexed by Google, a search on IUGALIBUS LATIN WIKTIONARY gets you where you need to be, and eventually, to the main entry for the adjective IUGALIS. What the Wiktionary doesn't tell you is the later (post-medieval) meaning that the word has acquired in church records and similar documents. Also, it's up to you, the reader, to work out the grammatical significance of the word endings, in this case the ablative plural, because the names of the parents (the married couple in question) were introduced by the preposition "ex". The number of different ways of saying the same thing in Latin results in the occurrence of many different word endings and word orders, far too many to include in a workable list.

    The old genealogical word lists prepared by the Family History Library are wonderful, especially since they were prepared with a view to the types of records we are most likely to encounter, but they only scratch the surface. If you work with records in any language for long enough, you will inevitably encounter words, abbreviations, grammar, and variant spellings that are far from obvious. Time to use the little gray cells!
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