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Please, use official names in toponyms

I don't understand the criteria used with toponyms in FamilySearch,

In Aragon (Spain), where Spanish is the official language Catalan exonyms are used. In Catalonia (Spain) where Catalan is the only official language for toponyms, Spanish exonyms are used.

In a page like https://familysearch.org/search/image... , with strange weird translations ans spellings, I have, lots of times, serious doubts about how to find the villages I'm looking for. I think it should be standardized using official names.
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  • In this example, it seems to me part of the problem could be mitigated if the waypoints (the labels for the image groups) started with the latest "official" village name first (I agree, there's no good reason not to use official toponyms, at least when no other alphabet is required), followed in parentheses by any alternative names, whether from the current "other" languages, or from names that were used in historical times. There are many other places in the world where local names have changed, sometimes very recently, or where significant variants exist. Examples abound! Some standard approach that clearly expresses these situations is essential, and once such a standard is formulated, it needs to be applied uniformly throughout the FamilySearch organization, including also the FHL catalogue.
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  • In other words, perhaps the reason for the initial observation in this thread is that no criteria exist for toponyms in some parts of FamilySearch!
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