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Translation needed

With the documents being put online and the necessity to travel to Salt Lake City to use all the available films being eliminated, there is still the problem of not being able to translate foreign language documents. How about adding a button to click on when there is a need to have a given document translated. A form could be provided to tell exactly what portion of the document needs translated (the document would remain visible) and the researcher could also click on a Paypal button to cover the cost of someone translating it for them.
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  • https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/...

    I suspect that since all the services on FamilySearch are free that FamilySearch would have no interest in brokering any type of fee-for-service translations.
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  • I think people would be willing to pay. It used to be that to order a film to come to your local FHC, one needed to pay. We pay for photo copies. I don't think charging a small fee would be inappropriate. Otherwise, some may take advantage of it and request translations that are really not necessary.
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  • Check out this article in the FS Wiki:
    https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/...

    "The Library staff translates names, dates, places, occupations, and familial relationships on a single page -- not entire documents. They will do this as time permits. If additional translation is needed, the following suggestions may be helpful:"
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    Over the years a number of language A to language B dictionaries have been published. In addition, there were a number of papers published that contained common genealogical terms in various languages and their equivalent in English (for English speaking folks. Today, the FamilySearch Wiki has those lists.

    See https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/... for links to various genealogical word lists.
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  • The problem of dealing with documents in "foreign" languages has plagued genealogists for a long time. There have been several notable steps along the way.

    One of the early highlights was the series of Language Guides published by the Family History Library. I believe they can still be found, and some of them are fantastically helpful, because they are full of examples from exactly the kind of records that most genealogists are likely to encounter (e.g., Spanish-language church records from Latin America).

    The next bit of advice is that many genealogists, starting with just the few tips gleaned from the language guides or how-to books, just took the plunge and began studying, say, Norwegian church records in detail. This "total immersion" method really works if you stick with it. You gradually learn the language, as well as the personal and place names of the parishes where your ancestors lived, and, by reading the church books more or less cover to cover, you also pick up relationships and other details about your own ancestors that were not mentioned in their own baptismal or marriage records.

    Today, the "total immersion" method words even better, thanks to the internet, Google, and especially, the "Wiktionary". At first, I found medieval Latin very difficult, because I was unable to find most of the words (in their inflected forms, due to the case system and the verb conjugations) in any dictionary. Once I discovered the Wiktionary, a sort of dictionary Wikipedia covering most modern languages, I was able to figure out almost everything with relatively little effort. When faced with, say, the verb form consueverunt, I simply do a google search: consueverunt latin Wiktionary. The top hit is usually the required entry in the Wiktionary that links to the complete conjugation of the verb, with all the information I need to understand the grammatical situation. A huge improvement!

    (Google translate can be helpful, but more often than not I find it produces amusing gibberish. Needs improvement.)
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