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What is the recommended link to the metadata for a book in the FamilySearch library?

I would like to provide a link to the FamilySearch catalogue entry for each book that i cite on my website. I currently use a link like:
https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/Deliver...
but this causes the entire book to download.

How do I form the link to the metadata for a book?

You are doing a terrific job!

Thank you,
Bob Wolfe, bobwolfe@umich.edu
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  • Robert,

    This doesn't directly answer your question, but it may help.
    You may not want to put a link in your current research since the URLs we use for books are not persistent archival links at this time. They may, and probably will, change as when we move the books to a different search system in the future.

    One way to address this for now is to reference the book by call number and institution. If you click on the little "i" button in the top right of a book's page it will open the information about the book. At the bottom you twill find sufficient info to construct a citation.

    A second way might be to link to the Family Search catalog page for the title. This can be found by using the title, or more precisely the call number, and doing a catalog search. For example

    https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/Deliver... is the page to a book.

    https://familysearch.org/search/catal... is the page for that same book in the catalog.

    Please understand I'm not an expert at all the nuances of properly building citations, but the institution and call number with links to the catalog page should allow a researcher in the future to properly locate the book.

    -R
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  • Hi Robert Wolfe

    Robert Kehrer wrote, " ... One way to address this for now is to reference the book by call number and institution."

    When it comes to accessibility, published materials shine, as so many have been widely distributed.

    More to the point, call numbers are usually unique to _a_ library, unlike the ISBN which sets out to be a standardized identifier internationally.[1]

    (1) If you want others to readily access the published book you used, you'll be doing them a favor by recording the (a) the author, (b) the precise title, (c) the date published (d) the page number. Except for the page number, the rest of the information is usually on the title page.

    (2) There are so many great platforms for accessing published materials. Here in the US, I'm pretty regular on Heritage Quest Online (thanks to my local library) and now the Digital Public Library of America (http://dp.la/).

    If you find yourself citation challenged, both of the platforms I mentioned will fashion a form of bibliographic citation for you.

    (3) Of course, "it's not all online," as they say. Some materials, especially those subject to copyright won't be available from your keyboard. If your local librarian isn't at the FHC, they too will appreciate the author/title/date (title page) approach when/if any of us seek their assistance. (Ooo. World Cat, too.)

    Hope this helps. --GeneJ

    P.S. I like to access the metadata, in part because I use some of the essential elements to catalog my own source materials. (Ala, keeping this information organized isn't just the business of big institutions!) When is a click worth more than a click? Wouldn't it be great if we could access the FamilySearch Catalog metadata!

    [1] Harrison College has a nice description of the difference between a Call Number and the ISBN. See
    http://harrison.libanswers.com/a.php?...
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  • To make citations long-lived, it is best if the citation describes characteristics inherent to the source. Call numbers, identification codes, and URLs can be specific to an institution or technology and change over space and time. Authors, title, and publication information for a particular item do not change. Citations that use this basic information will outlast transitory identification schemes and will allow discovery of other copies of published items at other repositories.

    One of several possible “correct” citations to this work could look like this:

    Ernest S. Parks and M.H. Pemberton, _The Ancestors and Descendents of Marmaduke Coate of South Carolina and Ohio_ (Gahanna, Ohio: Linda Coate Dudick, 1994).

    (For systems that don't allow italics in citations, I use underlines to bracket what should be italicized.)

    As common sense has told you, ignoring the convenience of an online copy of this work would be a disservice to ourselves and other researchers. This is especially the case for a self-published work with very few copies. Elizabeth Shown Mills provides guidance in her landmark citation style book, _Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace_.

    Supplement the basic citation with a citation to the online copy:

    Ernest S. Parks and M.H. Pemberton, _The Ancestors and Descendents of Marmaduke Coate of South Carolina and Ohio_ (Gahanna, Ohio: Linda Coate Dudick, 1994); digital images, _FamilySearch_ (http://familysearch.org : accessed 2 December 2013).

    In this example I chose not to specify the URL of either the PDF or the catalog. Those URLs will almost certainly change before the decade is out. We make the citation long-lived by specifying the homepage URL and the website title. Together with the information about the original publication, this citation will service researchers for decades to come.
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  • :-)

    I warned you that there were researchers much more skilled than I at proper citations. I'm glad they jumped in here to give you great guidance.

    None of that really addresses your original problem of not having a URL to a books metadata, I don't think we have a solution for that now. But, as Robert Raymond noted, that's probably not a bad thing in this case if you want your research notes to be accurate and useful long term.

    -R
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