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Worthless new Android app feature shows serious management feature development priority problems with the app

To quote the release notes of the Android app:

"Version 2.5.7 ...

...

New design for finding a person in the shared family tree."

They swing. They miss. Epic fail incoming with this feature.

What do we want to do when we SEARCH FOR A PERSON? Well I know I want and I'd hazard a guess I know what other people want: WE WANT TO FIND A PERSON!

So why on earth in this fancy "new design for finding a person" do the actual search results for a person not show up on screen immediately? Why if I search for a surname does a splash screen happily show up telling me the number with that surname in FSFT? Why do I have to then scroll down several screens to get to the actual results? Why if I run other searches do images of source documents pop up? Why do I have to then scroll up several screens to get to the actual results? Why are the actual results limited to only 24 possibilities?

THIS IS A COMPLETELY UNNECESSARY WASTE OF PROGRAMMING RESOURCES. How is this feature more useful than the previous version? Answer: it isn't. It looks fancier but actually inhibits usability by taking longer to reach the desired search results.

So what should have been prioritised instead? Proper feature parity with the website experience. There is a much smaller feature gap now but it is still there. Two notable features missing are adding unconnected individuals and a proper indication in the record search feature that a search result transcription is already attached to a profile.

The person directing that this feature be prioritised has a seriously skewed idea of what is useful. This is as bad as refusing to remove the GEDCOM import feature or refusing to sort out the dreadful default search parameters on the web version of FSFT record search from a particular profile. It is as bad as the misguided campaigns the marketing department keeps coming up with to send out to people for whom they are completely irrelevant.

Pull your fingers out!
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