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More information on chemicals that cause contact dermatitis?

I have just been diagnosed with allergies to several common chemicals, and the doctor told me to eliminate all products with those ingredients from my environment. Your page on methychloroisothiazolinone was very useful to me, allowing me to identify which products I have that contain the chemical, and giving me alternative product that didn't contain it. However, when I search on your site for some of the other chemicals I am allergic to, I don't find anything. It would be nice if there were pages on your site for the chemicals that people are most frequently allergic to, with links to products that contain and don't contain that chemical.
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  • Okay, now I have figured out that such pages indeed are on the website, but they just aren't coming up when I search for the chemical on the main searchbar at the top of the page. If I leave the goodguide website and search for the chemical plus "goodguide" in google, a link to the page that I want will come up there.
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  • We are looking into whether we can provide users with an easy way to select a health endpoint like contact dermatitis and get a list of chemicals associated with that problem as well as the products that contain them. It's a pretty complicated challenge, because we use literally hundreds of different lists of chemical hazards to assign levels of health concern to various chemicals.

    If you have access to a good library, it may be useful for you to go directly to some of our sources:
    Cosmetics Ingredient Review Panel. Final Report of the Amended Safety Assessment of Sodium Laureth Sulfate and Related Salts of Sulfated Ethoxylated Alcohols. International Journal of Toxicology July 2010 Vol. 29(4):151S-161S http://ijt.sagepub.com/content/29/4_s...
    Schauder, S. and H Ippen. Contact and photocontact sensitivity to sunscreens.
    Contact Dermatitis
    37(5); 221–232, November 1997. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10...
    Harvell, J., M. Bason and H. Maibach. Contact Urticaria and its Mechanisms. Food
    Chemistry and Toxicology
    32(2): 103-112. 1994. (Table 2: Substances identified as capable of causing contact urticaria).
    De Groot, A., M. Flyholm, G. Lensen, T. Menne and P. Coenraads. Formaldehyde-releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Contact allergy to formaldehyde and inventory of formaldehyde-releasers. Contact Dermatitis. 61: 63-85. 2009. (Table 2A: Chemicals for which adequate clinical data are available to identify them as formaldehyde releasers beyond doubt).
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  • Thanks very much for your reply. Actually, although information on specific health endpoints might be useful to me later, right now I am looking for something much simpler. I'm just trying to figure out which products don't contain chemicals that I'm allergic to. The pages on the goodguide website associated with specific chemicals are great for this. For any product I am interested in, I am able to get two parallel lists of products- those with the chemical and those without. But it took me a while to figure out how to find those pages on the website, since searching for the chemical name in the search bar did not bring them up.
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