aspect ratio field

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i just want to point out that this is very nor very helpful

"4:3 letterbox" is up or down? for example i'm adding a 2.20:1 video which is baked into a 16:9 file. so will it be 16:9 WITH letterbox added or a 2:20:1 WITH letterbox added
i mean other way around. or other way around

would be really helpful to add example images, that will take about 30 seconds in paintbrush with line and bucket tool, a couple of Kb to page and about 200-300 pixels of space
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agof

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Posted 4 weeks ago

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Richard Shepherd

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I'mt nor sure I entirely understand your question but perhaps these tools may help:
https://www.omnicalculator.com/other/aspect-ratio
https://calculateaspectratio.com/

If you are asking what I think you are asking, 4:3 would be the end-result. So, if you baked your original video into a 16:9 then don't worry about the letterbox, upload it as a 16:9 video. Or re-bake into a 4:3 ... again I'm a bit confused about what you are asking so this may not be the answer you are looking for.
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agof

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4^3 baked into 16^9 would be pillarboxed
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Eboy

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I also don’t fully understand the question. ”Letterboxing” usually refers to home video or TV broadcasts - not the original aspect ratio. Not fully sure what it means to IMDb, actually.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lette...
(Edited)
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agof

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when you create a new title IMDB asks you to chose its aspect ratio.
there are "letterboxed" options

does 16^9 letterbox mean that it is a video made of cinematic source with added bars to fit 16^9, or is it a 16^9 source with added bars to fit, say 4^3

in my example there is a 2^20.1 video frame baked into 16^9 file with bars and it's the official release
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Peter, Champion

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does 16^9 letterbox mean that it is a video made of cinematic source with added bars to fit 16^9, or is it a 16^9 source with added bars to fit, say 4^3

"4:3 letterbox" must mean a wider image made to fit 4:3 by adding bars top and bottom.

By extension, "16:9 letterbox" should mean a wider image made to fit 16:9 by adding bars top and bottom.
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Richard Shepherd

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I think it means (regardless of the original source) the end result fits a 16:9 with a letterbox around it. Hope that helps some. :)
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Richard Shepherd

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Let me rephrase my above post:

The file you have, if you were to play it on a 16:9 screen and it would appear with no black bars around it at all, you upload it as 16:9. If it does have black bars, upload it as 16:9 letterboxed. So you have a 2.20:1 baked into a 16:9 and it has bars, therefore in this case it's 16:9 letterboxed.

So they mean a 16:9 is untouched and fits a 16:9 perfectly. A 16:9 letterbox is a cinematic source fitted into 16:9 with bars. (I think).

At least that's my understanding of what IMDB means.
(Edited)
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agof

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upload what?

it's about adding new title to imdb, not uploading files
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Richard Shepherd

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Oh, I'm sorry, I thought you were trying to add something like a trailer etc...

Ignore the upload part of my post and add the title as 16:9 letterboxed. 
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Eboy

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Agof, you probably should just add the original aspect ratio. ”Letterbox” is not related to original aspect ratio. It could come into play when the film is transferred to home video, or shown on TV (where the original aspect ratio is preserved by adding black bars).

Again, IMDb should clarify the meaning (to them), since it’s now listed as one of the options. It’s a bit confusing.

From Wiki:
”Letterboxing is the practice of transferring film shot in a widescreen aspect ratio to standard-width video formats while preserving the film's original aspect ratio.”
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Peter, Champion

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"4:3 Letterbox" is probably mostly for TV from a time when broadcasts were in 4:3, but some content was produced in 16:9.
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Eboy

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Yes, that’s why it’s probably listed under ”TV”. I personally would recommend that IMDb should delete the whole option. I don’t see why IMDb should list how the TV stations (or VHS/DVD releases) present the film. It only matters what the actual aspect ratio is, and for IMDb: the original aspect ratio. ”Letterbox”, ”open matte”, ”anamophic” (unless we’re talking about the actual lenses of the camera), ”non-anamophic” etc mainly refer how the film is presented in home video or TV. And now even those terms are becoming obsolete.
(Edited)
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agof

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there are a lot of situations where framing and camera are of one aspect ratio, but the only existing means to consume the media are in any form of boxing. (probably due to releaser incompetence)

if you are to try to launch that on some casual hardware you'll get severe window-boxing
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Eboy

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Again, the actual aspect ratio is what matters and IMDb usually lists the ”original aspect ratio”. Others (like home video, TV broadcasts or ”hardware” related issues) are pretty much irrelevant, unless - of course - the OAR is changed (framing, cropping) for some reason later on.

( Like with ”The Sopranos” or ”The Wire”. Or like Storaro wanted 2.20:1 aspect ratio at some point for Apocalypse Now (it was later restored to 2.35:1, though). Or some Hammer films, which were shown 1.66:1 in some areas, and 1.85:1 in some - and people keep debating what’s the OAR. Obviously there are several exceptions. )