Character names - clarification with comma

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( This is a spin-off of the earlier thread:
https://getsatisfaction.com/imdb/topi...

A few additional questions from the thread:

1)
- From IMDb guide:
”Commas should not be used.”
Guide: https://help.imdb.com/article/contrib...#

- Will’s example (note, that there’s a comma between the words ”General” and ”United”):
”Megan Brennan *** Herself - United States Postmaster General, United States Postal Service”

- My additional question: Should it be?

1) Megan Brennan *** Herself - United States Postmaster General: United States Postal Service // Cook, Tim *** Himself - Chief executive officer: Apple Inc.
OR
2) Megan Brennan *** Herself - United States Postmaster General - United States Postal Service // Cook, Tim *** Himself - Chief executive officer - Apple Inc.

2) From the guide:

”For descriptive character names (e.g., Mayor, Man #1), they should generally be entirely in the language of the original version, but English can be used if the original is not known.”

Does this also mean the real life occupations (him/herself), like ”director”, ”teacher”, ”prime minister” etc?

Thanks again.
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Eboy

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Posted 4 months ago

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Michelle, Official Rep

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Hi Eboy -

I replied on the other thread as well, to clarify, if the comma is displayed within the on-screen credit, such as "United States Postmaster General, United States Postal Service", then a comma is acceptable to be listed with the credit.  In cases where a separation needs to be made but there is no on-screen comma, in these instances our preference is to use a hyphen.

Concerning your second question, for self credits (himself/herself), where appropriate, a short description of their role in the title should be followed by a hyphen, but not their role in 'life'.  So if an individual is an activist and a teacher, we only want the description of their role in the film, so if their role is speaking as an activist, it would be listed as "himself - activist" (not "himself - teacher").
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Eboy

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Thank you, comma vs hyphen seems to be pretty clear now.

With the second question, I (basically) mean news/current affairs/documentaries where a person is ”him/herself”, and his/her occupation is also listed in the caption (along with the name). I mean the occupation listed in the actual caption, not descriptive names (”Man on the bus” etc).

Like for example, a theater/movie director is appearing on the news story and the on-screen caption says:

”John Doe
Director”

And since I was referring to the non-English programs, should I use the original text in the original language?

- John Doe - - - Himself - directeur (example: French)
- John Doe - - - Himself - direktør (example: Danish)
- John Doe - - - Himself - regisseur (example: German)
OR just translate it to English:
- John Doe - - - Himself - Director
OR just to use:
- John Doe - - - Himself

Thanks!
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Jeorj Euler

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Yes.