Credits not on screen but listed online

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Many modern television programmes don't have on-screen credits and instead say something like "For full credits, go to our website", with the full credits being listed on the official website. It seems misleading to have to credit everyone (including producers, directors, editors, etc.) as uncredited if they are actually credited in the official place the credits are supposed to be. The on-screen rule seems outdated. It also looks silly and unnecessary to have everyone on the IMDb cast/crew list with "(uncredited)" next to their name. Additionally, it means the credits on the individuals' IMDb pages look less important than they are actually are. For example, if someone is an assistant editor in television, but all their credits on their page are "uncredited", it makes them look like they're not actually a proper assistant editor.
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Matt

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Posted 2 years ago

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Adrian, Champion

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I probably watch way more television than most people and I have never seen "for full credits, go to our website". Can you point to a series that does this? I record somewhere near 125+ series on my DVR and have never seen it.
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Matt

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Reality shows do it a lot. (For context, I live in Australia.) For example, here is a screenshot from the end of the most recent episode of The Bachelor:


And here is the credits list on the website: https://tenplay.com.au/channel-ten/the-bachelor/credits
(Edited)
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Matt

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I checked an episode of The Bachelorette US and it had on-screen credits. American shows possibly always do because of union rules. Website credits happen a lot in Australia, and I'm fairly sure I've seen it for British shows too (including dramas).
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Martin

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I wonder if it's distributor-dependent rather than programme-maker-dependent. In other words, the programme is made with conventional end-credits (cast and crew) but some distributors (eg Australian TV companies) choose to chop off those credits and replace them with a "for full credits see our website" caption.

In that case, the definitive credits (in terms of completeness and order of cast) should be taken from the original programme-maker's on-screen credits.

If you've seen it on British shows when they are shown in Australia, then I think it is almost certainly a change made by the Australian broadcaster, because I've never seen it on a British programme when it is shown here in Britain.
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Matt

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No, it's not that. The example I gave of The Bachelor is a show made in Australia for an Australian audience. The production company (Warner Bros) made the show to the distributor's (Network Ten) specifications. I've noticed that Network Ten often put their credits online, whereas the Seven Network (including with shows made by Warner Bros) often don't have credits at all. It's a common Australian thing to not have on-screen credits for factual and reality programming on commercial free-to-air television. I'm sure there must be other countries that are similar.

My comment on British shows was referring to shows I've seen on British television/catch-up, though that's just my memory and I could be wrong.
(Edited)