Irritating title

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  • Updated 6 years ago
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All i wanted to do was change the title of the film 'You're Next (2011)' to 'You're Next (2013)'...Since it's not out until later this month. But the site won't let me even though I told them everything they needed to know lol. Fine, they can keep the wrong name...
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Rory O'Flaherty

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Posted 6 years ago

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sienel, Champion

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The You're Next located here - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1853739/ - did screen at the Toronto Film Festival in 2011. I assure you many many people saw it.
See some of the reviews from Sept 2011:
http://variety.com/2011/film/reviews/...
http://collider.com/youre-next-review/
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat...

Quite often films are released in theatres multiple years after they debuted at a film festival. Lions Gate picked the film up directly from the festival - you would need to ask them why they sat on the film for two years. But the IMDb uses the earliest screening date for the title, so 2011 looks to be accurate.

Or are you referring to a different film?
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Rory O'Flaherty

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No...same film. You're right, my apologies, Canada in 2011...wow...they really waited on releasing that one. Do you know why they put the film festival year though, when people will generally only know it from the year it came out in cinema? Thanks so much for the advice and reviews, I 'm looking forward to seeing it for myself.
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bluesmanSF, Champion

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Re:
Do you know why they put the film festival year though, when people will generally only know it from the year it came out in cinema?.


As I linked above, that's how IMDb titles are formatted. All films in the database are done the same way. They don't make an exception based on time between first and wide release.

Title Formats

We use the original title of a movie/show in its original language as it appears on screen (on the title card) in the opening credits. So all alternative titles found on posters, DVD boxes, reference books, trailers, websites, re-releases, etc. are irrelevant. They do NOT define what the primary title should look like. All titles must include the year of first public screening enclosed in ()'s as explained further below.


The date shown denotes first public screening. Nothing else. Not year made, not year release widely, or in your neighborhood, etc. Simply the year of first public screening.
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Rory O'Flaherty

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Thanks BluesmanSF, good to know, just found it odd.
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bluesmanSF, Champion

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Yeah, there'd be several ways to go there...like list the date completed, but there is probably best evidence and most consistency in using the first shown...that's just the way they went with that.

You're welcome!
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vhavnal

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I added that title to IMDb in early 2011 and as sienel mentioned, the release year isn't for international release but for when it was screened first, even if its for a limited audience..