Live Poll: Comedy Types

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  • Updated 1 year ago
  • (Edited)
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ElMo

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Posted 1 year ago

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Stephen N Russell

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Action comedy, comedy of errors.
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dgranger

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Never really thought about it as to which type I personally consider as my favorite just as long it is dumb. There has to be some food for the mind in it.
But wouldn’t “Arsenic and Old Lace” fit better as Black Comedy than Plup Fiction”? “Bringing Up Baby” is usually defined as the best in screwball comedy. I can think of more modern ones as presentative of that type.

I think a short definition of each type would help. Why? I was thinking of some of the types you could have missed, like sex comedies or role reversals, when I realize that “Comedy of manners” would cover role reversals. But how many people know what that term means. I personally got into trouble with African Americans who had thought the term “Black Comedy” refers to comedy by African American people, and they didn’t know that term actually refers to comedy involving death, crime, sin and such.
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Jeorj Euler

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What kind of comedy is Pulp Fiction?
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dgranger

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I don’t think of “Pulp Ficton” as a comedy at all. I think it was meant to be exactly what the title meant it to be: a collection of lurid detective and crime stories. They were just all interconnected crime stories in the film. And the story of the two bumbling hit men was used as comic relief to offset the the rest of the tension of the rest of the stories. I mean after the story with the hit men, do you see anything funny in the rest of the stories? No. In fact, John Travolta’s performance as Vincent Vega was basically him reprising his ”Welcome Back, Kotter” role of Vinnie Barbarino (aka Vinnie Barbarino grew up to become the hit man Vincent Vega - the airhead dumbness Of the character are that similar).
In fact, I am reminded of another pair of hit men who cracked jokes while doing there job. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066995/...
Mr. Kidd and Mr. Wint from Diamonds Are Forever (1971). That movie is not a comedy but they were cracking jokes much darker than Vincent Vega and Jules Winnfield were. Hmmm face off between the two? Nah too obvious. Someone probably already thought of it and did it by now. But maybe not?
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ElMo

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I removed it :)
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Nikolay Yeriomin (Mykola Yeromin), Champion

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Actually Tarantino has gone on record numerous times that he intended Pulp Fiction to be comedy, to the point that he suggested it should be under that section in the video store. 
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Jeorj Euler

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I'd be inclined to agree with Tarantino, but the counterpoint, with no offense to him meant, is that he is a very sick man. Haha. Some of the stuff he might find hilarious, only maybe one tenth of the humanity overall would also find to be hilarious, a large enough portion that I wouldn't feel comfortable psychoanalyzing "them" (perhaps myself included), yet here I am. There is no need to fix the "sickness". It may not be a genuine a defect. His work is suitable for broad grow-up audiences, but only a portion of that audience would appreciate the work in the same or a similar way that he does. Most of the subject material of Pulp Fiction is downright horrifying, if looked at outside of, say, a prism of desensitization. We are supposed to do the opposite of suspending disbelief in these cases, or at least remember and appreciate the fact "it's just a movie" ("and thank goodness for that"), for the sake of remaining sane. Regardless, comic violence is a legitimate part of aestheticization of violence, and thereby it cannot be much worse than the encompassing concept, for those who are not too pleased about violence (whether reenactment or fantastical) in media in general.
(Edited)
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තරිඳු ධනංජය/Thorin

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dark comedy for me. :D
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Dan Dassow, Champion

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ElM,

Great poll. I enjoy all of these kinds of comedy when they are done well. This is my order of preference.

1. PARODY
2. SATIRE
3. MUSICAL COMEDY
4. SCREWBALL COMEDY
5. SLAPSTICK COMEDY
6. ACTION COMEDY
7. COMEDY OF ERRORS
8. ROMANTIC COMEDY
9. COMEDY OF MANNERS
10. BLACK COMEDY
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Jen, Champion

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FYC:
Horror comedy - Zombieland, Shaun of the Dead
Dramedy - Dan in Real Life, The Royal Tenenbaums
Fish Out of Water - Tootsie, Encino Man
Sci-Fi comedy - Ghostbusters, Men in Black
Military comedy - Private Benjamin, Stripes
Gross out comedy - Porky's, American Pie
Burlesque - Gold Diggers of 1933, She Done Him Wrong
Fantasy comedy - Big, Bruce Almighty
Farce - Some Like It Hot, The Birdcage

Also, found this regarding parody vs. spoof vs. satire. In case you were interested...
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dgranger

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“ For instance, it's not clear what movie Airplane is a parody of, but it is possibly a parody of 1950s television ads by airlines. ”
That answer is obvious if you look at the movies of that period. The late sixties and the 1970’s was the period for disaster movies.
- The Last Voyage (1960)
- Voyage to the Bottom Of the Sea (1961)
- The Poseidon Adventure (1972)
- The Towering Inferno (1974)
- Earthquake (1974)
And the series Of movies based on Alex Hailey’s bestselling novel “Airport”.
- Airport (1970) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065377/...
- Airport 1975 (1974) That is not a typo. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071110/ it is were the sunglasses, the autopilot, and nuns singing on the plane jokes were inspired by. Don’t believe me? Watch the film’s trailer https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071110/...
- Airport '77 (1977) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075648/
- The Concorde... Airport '79 (1979) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0078740/

“Airplane!” Was released in 1980 and was obviously parodying disaster movies and the Airport series in particular .

You can possibles your consider “The High and the Mighty”, “Island In the Sky”, and 1965 orginnal Of “The Flight of the Phoenix” too. But the safe bet is the Airport disaster movies.
(Edited)
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Dimos Dicoudis

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"For instance, it's not clear what movie Airplane is a parody of, but it is possibly a parody of 1950s television ads by airlines."

Most of the plot and the central characters (along with the name "Ted Stryker") are taken directly from "Zero Hour!" (1957). Though "Airplane!" changed the setting of the film from Canada to the United States. The role of Ted Stryker was played by Dana Andrews. 

"Zero Hour!" was itself a film adaptation of the teleplay (theatrical play written and produced for television) "Flight into Danger" (1956) by writer Arthur Hailey (1920-2004). Hailey was a retired military pilot for the Royal Air Force (RAF), and a World Wat II veteran. So a story about a traumatized combat pilot was typical for him.

In the original teleplay, "Ted Stryker " was named "George Spencer". The character was played by actor James Doohan, who was chosen for the role because he was himself a retired military pilot and World War II veteran. 
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dgranger

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Actually I got the name wrong. Guess who wrote “Airport”. The same writer. Arthur Hailey. Go ahead check. I’m right on it. He also wrote “Hotel” too. His trademark was epic spectacular themes.
Are you trying to tell me this scene from Airplane! Isn’t parody the nun playing the guitar for the sick girl in “Airport 75” compare it to the clip in my last post. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5pXFo14...
They may had taken the character of “Ted Stryker” from “Zero Hour” but the rest was all from the “Airport” franchise.
(Edited)
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Dimos Dicoudis

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In "Zero Hour!", has-been pilot Ted Stryker joins Cross-Canada Air Lines Flight 714 in an attempt to reconcile with his wife Ellen Stryker, who has recently left him and wants a divorce. 

The fish served on the plane as a meal was tainted, and several passengers and crew are suffering from food poisoning in mid-flight.  Both the pilot and co-pilot are seriously ill, and someone has to fly the airplane. Stryker is the only other pilot on board, though he has not piloted anything since the Royal Canadian Air Force kicked him out for getting much of fighter squadron killed. His former superior Captain Martin Treleaven is called back on duty to give Stryker flight instructions through the radio.


Sounds familiar? As for Arthur Hailey, his trademark as a sceenwriter and novelist was depicting "ordinary people involved in extaordinary situations in a business or industry which is described in meticulous detail". He had a reputation for doing extensive research before writing any novel: "His research was painstaking: he read 27 books about the hotel industry for Hotel, he spent months at a Detroit car plant for Wheels, and he spent time—at the age of 67—with rebel guerillas in the jungles of Peru for The Evening News. "

Adaptations of his works were largely responsible for starting the "disaster film" genre. 
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dgranger

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Some we are both agreeing that “Airplane!” Is a parody of disaster movies, particularly airplane disasters. films, specially those based on the novels or plays by Arthur Hailey. We just disagree on which work.
But here is something that ties your argument closer to mine because when the object being parodied is ether a) currently well known and popular or b) older works works are that very well known, so that audience can immediately recognize what is being parodied. “Zero Hour!” was not that well known while the “Airport” films was still fresh in the general public at the time “Airplane!” was made in 1980. Now here is the part that ties our arguments together with “the currently popular” part. In 1971, just after the movie “Airport” was released in 1970, a made for TV movie was aired on “ABC’s Tuesday Night Movie Of the Week” television series. It was Terror In the Sky. Guess whose novel and screenplay was used for that film. You guessed it is you had said Arthur Hailey’s television play Flight into Danger (1956) which was adapted from his novel “Runway Zero-Eight”. It was considered a remake of “Zero Hour!” (Isn’t funny how TV movies that used the same story that was made earlier as a film are considered as a “Remake.” But not the other way around? A cinema movie is not considered as make of a television show or TV movie if the television show was first.) anyway, that places that particular story squarely in the middle of the disaster film vogue of the 1970’s which “Airplane!” parodies. Clearly, Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, Jerry Zucker, the people who wrote the script for “Airplane!”. did their research into Hailey and found out about these two films and decided include the exclamation mark from “Zero Hour!” into the title of “Airplane!”. But as I said, there jokes and scenes in “Airplane!”, that are straight from the “Airport” franchise.
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Jen, Champion

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dgranger

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How about “Comic Relief”? My description of it. “Comedy or wisecrack or aside inserted into a non comedy play or movie in order to temporarily relieve or lessen the tension of the story and give the audience a short break.”

Raiders of the Lost Ark - where a tired Indie just shoots this guy instead of fighting him. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082971/...
(Edited)
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ElMo

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I like that...
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Dimos Dicoudis

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"How about “Comic Relief”? My description of it. “Comedy or wisecrack or aside inserted into a non comedy play or movie in order to temporarily relieve or lessen the tension of the story and give the audience a short break.” "

The trope was also used in theatrical plays, with comical scenes in tragic plays. For example in  "Hamlet" (c. 1599) by William Shakespeare, a scene where Claudius plots to murder his nephew and Ophelia's suicide is announced, is followed by one where two gravediggers are cracking jokes and playing riddles while working. Though the jokes themselves are gallows humor:

Gravedigger:

*What is he that builds stronger than either the mason, the shipwright, or the carpenter?

Other
*
The gallows-maker, for that frame outlives a thousand tenants.

And later in the scene:

Gravedigger

*And when you are asked this question next, say “A grave-maker.” The houses that he makes last till doomsday. 

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Dan Dassow, Champion

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ElMo

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VIS COMICA!
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Dan Dassow, Champion

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Congratulations ElMaruecan82 on your 480th live poll! As of 18-Jul-2018 8:11 PM Pacific your polls have 956,108 or more votes, for an average of 1,992 votes per poll.

The Many Types of Comedy
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CM Co.

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My Favorite type of comedy, that sadly I couldn't find an exact correlation to on your list, is Serious Comedy. The idea of serious comedy is that everyone on screen is taking whatever situation is happening as seriously as possible. I can't think of a good movie that exemplifies this off the top of my head, but a good example from a TV Show is the "Potato Chip Scene" in the anime Death Note

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrpdFmb0EMc

Obviously, this scene is "deathly" serious for all characters who are in it, but the audience watching understands that this is totally ridiculous.

If this was in the poll, I must've overlooked it, but if not then here's my answer. (Other than Parody/Satire and Action Comedy which are tied for 2nd)