Should court-proven plagiarism merit a writing listing automatically?

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A Fistful of Dollars (Per un pugno di dollari) (1964), being the classic it is, also is a court-proven plagiarism of Yôjinbô (1961). As such, Akira Kurosawa is listed as uncredited source material writer on the former, although his co-writer Ryûzô Kikushima is strangely missing from the listings and I wonder whether he should be re-added. I say "re-added" because at one point there were literally more then fifteen writing listings on that movie, not all of which were deemed justified. Albeit, I think, this one is.  

I know of at least one similar case: Lockout (2012) is a court-proven plagiarism of Escape From New York (1981). Should John Carpenter and Nick Castle be listed as uncredited source material writers on the former, as well?  
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Nikolay Yeriomin (Mykola Yeromin), Champion

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Posted 1 year ago

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Adrian, Champion

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Courts haven proven many things that are not indeed factual. Dow-Corning was sued into bankruptcy due to silicon breast implants though the science says they cause connectivity tissue disorder at no greater rate than not having implants. I wouldn't take "court judgments" as being definitive statements on anything.
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Jeorj Euler

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If all the evidence surrounding a case is as much a part of the public record as the court proceedings themselves, then we can evaluate that evidence regardless of the outcome of the court case.
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Adrian, Champion

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The question would be who evaluates it and there would need to be a whole guideline on what is acceptable.

Nosferatu is clearly based on Dracula and was sued out of existence. How it survived is still a mystery.
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Jeorj Euler

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Bram Stoker should have credit for writing novel from which Nosferatu rips off.
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Adrian, Champion

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Would that be with an (uncredited) attribute? I would think these thinks more belong under trivia or the no longer available "literature" section.
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Jeorj Euler

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Hi, Adrian. As you yourself suggested, that is the question; or perhaps an additional question. I think, for Nosferatu's case, I would go so far as to suggest a crew list addition bearing the "uncredited" attribute, but I would also have to review both the novel and the film myself beforehand, if would get serious about it.
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Vincent Fournols

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My first reaction is that the present IMDb ideology is to be a credit registry, regardless of what can be obtained from research and analysis. The logic behind that is to mention the court order in the trivia.
Now, in my own ideal IMDb, it ought to be credited as you propose!
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Will, Official Rep

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Hi Nikolay,

Good question, I've raised this with our writer policy head and I'll let you know the outcome of our discussions.

Regards,
Will
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Will, Official Rep

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Hi all,

Yes we have confirmed that in cases where there is court-proven plagiarism we will accept an (uncredited) writer credit for those names on the later project. We've also updated the writers submission guide to list this. We've also added the credits listed above.

Regards,
Will
(Edited)
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Nikolay Yeriomin (Mykola Yeromin), Champion

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Great thanks for clarification and update, Will!