What was the last film you saw and how would you rate it? Pt. 18

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Thought I'd post this here until I hear we're doing it somewhere else....

Post the name of the latest movie you've seen and your rating out of 10. 
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Sunshine Boys (t0073766) - 7/10 - loved Burns, hated Matthau.
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Jen, Champion

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Posted 3 years ago

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joe siegel

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Say Anything...(1989) 8/10
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NarniaisAwesome

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The 6th Day, 2000, 5/10.  Some good car chases and the actors do a good job but I don't really follow the plot outside of "cloning, he's the clone, not him."  :)  Features a LOT of Arnold "getting to the choppa!"  :)
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Stephen Atwood

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Blood Legacy (1971) AKA Legacy of Blood AKA Will to Die, 1/10. 8/10 for the Cinematic Titanic commentary.
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Dracko

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Rumble Fish(1983) 8/10
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Dracko

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The Tale of The Princess Kaguya (2013) 9/10
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NarniaisAwesome

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Clue, 1985, 4/10.  Barely okay mystery based on the game, I'm not sure how I feel about the three different endings.  Just present us with one and leave it at that!  That being said, it has some kinda funny parts and the cast does a great job at their roles (but that doesn't mean they're all likable.)
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NarniaisAwesome

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Bewitched, 2005, 7/10.  I just found my new Halloween staple!  :D  Not a particularly hilarious movie, but it's cute and fun.  Kidman's adorable performance reminds me of Amy Adams in Enchanted.  I never really liked the old show but I like this.  :)

High Spirits, 1988, 3/10.  I've not found my new Halloween staple.  :)  The concept is good, but it's sloppy.  

And how does Bewitched have a lower rating than High Spirits on IMDb?
(Edited)
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Stephen Atwood

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Friday:
Joker (2019) 8/10.

This afternoon:
Promare (2019)

I'm taking this one as a parody of particularly cheesy pop anime.  Seems too tongue and cheek and self-aware of its blatant abuse of many anime tropes. In that case, an 8/10 rating. If not? Not really sure how to rate. 

And in the audience, I clearly wasn't the only one to laugh at the obvious trope punts. Deus Ex Machina my tukas!

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Dracko

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Ad Astra(2019) 8/10
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NarniaisAwesome

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Hugo, 5/10.  I'm 100% sure this is the longest movie ever.  Seemed like an eternity and no, I never paused it.  Anyways, it's an okay movie, begins to get old and is only interesting in the middle.  But it is fun to see the history of film and how they did things before CGI.  :)

Mrs. Ashboro's Cat (or Ghost Cat), 3/10.  I was wrong.  This is the longest movie ever.  Took me three nights to watch - and I still didn't quite finish it!  A little good at the beginning, but begins to lag.  If I don't care about finishing a movie, it's bad.
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Grant Orzechowski

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Beneath the 12 Mile Reef
6/10.

Slow boring 1950s movie, but does keep suspense going.
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Stephen Atwood

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Aladdin (2019), 7/10.

Rewatch:
Spider-Man: Far from Home (2019), 8/10.
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Stephen Atwood

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Dolor y gloria (2019) AKA Pain and Glory, 9/10.
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Stephen Atwood

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Parasite (2019), 10/10.
Parasite

My preliminary favorite 2019 films so far...
1. Parasite (2019)
 I Want to Eat Your Pancreas
2. I Want to Eat Your Pancreas (2018)

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
3. Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood (2019)

Toy Story 4
4. Toy Story 4 (2019)

Booksmart
5. Booksmart (2019)

















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Bulma PunkRocker

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El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie. I gave it an 8/10.
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albstein

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Joker (2019) - 7/10. Somewhat disappointing. (spoilers)

The trailer promised a mix of Taxi Driver and King of Comedy, and as far as premise and aesthetics are concerned, the movie delivered. Arthur Fleck is one of those desperate guys, you don't know whether he's weird because he's lonely or the other way around. Like Travis Bickle, he projects his personal failings to the outer world, which is shabby and corrupt to be fair. Like Rupert Pupkin, he aspires to be loved for his (nonexistent) charm and talents.

Unlike Travis and Rupert, Arthur does have a fully fledged backstory. His mom is delusionary; he was mistreated as a child; he grew up fatherless; he is mentally ill and takes many pills. We can see Rupert and especially Travis as mirrors of our own hidden evils, but Arthur's evils are explained as purely pathological and entirely personal. We can't really relate to him and let us be challenged by his actions. Even the brilliant idea of the sudden, unwanted, depressed laughter is insistently reduced to a medical condition.

(Note: it's not that it's hard to relate to Arthur because he is mentally ill, but because he is only mentally ill. There is not much room for a personality beyond that, and no unexplainable rest which we could fill with our own dispositions)

Yes, the movie touches upon social issues here and there but doesn't delve into much. Rich people are out of touch and greedy, poor people are sick and violent, that's to what the social "critique" amounts. There is the interesting notion that the Joker might be a vigilante, which would make his roots similar to that of his "good" foe, Batman. It is discarded quickly. One scene I did like involves Thomas Wayne, just after having insulted poor people as clowns, watching "Modern Times" in the movie theater, presumably intrigued by that poor, clown-like schmuck on the screen.

Arthur, or rather the Joker, has many followers, which we as the audience see precisely the way Thomas Wayne would: they are rioters who hate the rich. Who are they? What do they suffer from? What do they do, except for exerting random acts of violence? The movie isn't interested in all that.

At least the movie tried something radically different from most superhero movies, and I appreciate the effort. It could have amounted to more. Dark and gritty does not equal subversive.
(Edited)
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Dracko

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El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie 9/10
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15yearsIMDber

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15yearsIMDber

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JOKER 9/10

Todd Philips’ “Joker” has spread so many comments and controversy that I don’t know exactly where to stand. The film reminded critics of Martin Scorsese’s “Taxi Driver” and while Joaquin Phoenix’ performance channeled the inner angst and alienation that drove the driver Bickle to an extreme –and bloody- corner, I found so many other sources of inspiration that if anything, “Joker” is the best tribute to the New Hollywood period.

I found “Network” in the film, “Death Wish”, references to “The King of Comedy”, Marty’s underrated movie about a man who wished to exist through the only talent he felt being endowed with... and naturally, there’s something of “A Clockwork Orange” in the obscene stylishness the Joker embraces his new persona with. In a way, that the film met with controversy is logical, you can’t make a social comment about violence and its dangerous appeal by sugarcoating it, violence like its enemies, use symbols and slogan, in fact, revolt is a mask that violence uses to operate undercover or is it the opposite? “Joker” is the slap today’s audiences needed and that it used the Joker mask in our superhero era makes it even more relevant and accessible. But truth be said, any controversy the film should stir mustn’t distract from the real deal.

Indeed, any viewer familiar with one tenth of Phoenix’ filmography knows the actor’s ability to portray enigmatic and troubled characters with a dark side barely hidden, but even with that in mind it’s impossible not to be blown away by his performance and compelled by his suffering. He shouldn’t be the dark horse of the awards season but the frontrunner because his performance is so rich, so powerful, so intense and so bizarre and grotesque in a captivating way that it’s almost like watching a movie within a movie, as if his distortable face was the operation theatre to his acting force, as if his nervous smile slowly turning into cries made a true symphony of pathos and anger. That actor is a treasure to Hollywood and here he’s given the kind of rangy performances that can’t do without earning awards. His snubbing would be controversy material if you asked me.

Now, to the film. The first act immerses us in the life of Arthur Fleck, a clown and wannabe stand-up comedian. At first, I was afraid that the manic laughter scenes would be too redundant and turn themselves to cheap gimmicks, to remind us that we’re dealing with the Joker, but no, Phoenix plays his Arthur as a man who’s not a bad person. Raised by an over-protective and sickly mother, brutalized by kids who sees in a clown a living sign saying “kick me”, humiliated by people who can’t understand his medical condition, the point isn’t to portray Joker as a martyr but a product of a specific environment and education, or lack thereof. Like anyone, he’s got dreams, projects, but he’s entrapped in a condition that makes it impossible to communicate or connect with the others except through hallucinations and would-happen moments, he’s a misfit with a fragile condition that keeps worsening until it offers a platform for his dark psyche to perform.

Does the film excuse him? No. Does it justify his actions? Hell, no. It just clarifies the need to perform that way. There’s a point of no return reached in that psychological journey, when one humiliation too many triggers a strong desire to express itself through a sort of showmanship, something relevant in our days where people seek any ways to reach posterity. Set in what seems to be the early 80s, it puts Arthur in the same urban alienation context than Travis Bickle but with a passion shared with Rupert Pumpkin’s and a “mad-as-hell” prophetic rage with Howard Beale’s role. Near the end, there’s a shot that follows one of the film’s most shocking moment and it’s an obvious nod to the anticlimactic finale of Lumet’s masterpiece. 

But I can’t insist too much on how good Phoenix his, one could see a few impersonations of Malcolm McDowell’s dance when he “punished” his fellow droogs or get vibes from the two only performances that earned a posthumous Oscar, Peter Finch and Heath Ledger, still, there’s something unique in that tormented role he inhabits with such a soul dedication that it makes Nicholon’s Joker worse than the cartoon counterpart. ,

“Joker” isn’t dangerous but brave enough to question violence in the way it seems like the only plausible answer, it might titillate a few demagogue instincts but that’s an unfair trial in the light of the recent events all over the world and that preceded the film. I walk often at night and see homeless people living in impoverished conditions, drowning their sorrows in alcohol and losing their manners once there’s nothing to lose...  and perhaps that’s leaders’ responsibility, praising democratic values while its application contradicts its own ideal. Anything is allowed when nothing is possible, is perhaps the biggest joke of all, and that it goes all downhill when the social budget is cut is perhaps the film’s boldest stance against the shift between leaders and people.

And that it used Bruce’s father Thomas Wayne to connect the final act with a canon we’re all familiar with is one of the many narrative delights of that character study and psychological thriller à la “Woman Under the Influence” where suspense doesn’t come from a bomb but a ticking bomb of a soul. If De Niro’s presence ties the plot with its chief inspirations, the film belongs to Joaquin Phoenix who gave a performance for ages, and a character who’s relevant in the way he pits democratic ideals against urban reality. And my wish is to see another connection with De Niro with Phoenix winning an Oscar, it would be the second time for a character who already won one after De Niro with “The Godfather Part II”.

 As for the glorifying violence trial... we’ve been there already.



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albstein

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When I read your take on Phoenix in another thread, I wondered when you will write your review. Glad that came so quickly. Fully agree on Phoenix' performance.

Although I don't go as far as you in praise, Joker comes back to me again and again. for some reason I imagine myself put on a clown costume and dance on some stairs, all while listening to the Gary Glitter song.

It's funny, the day before my movie buddy and I went to see the movie, we were chatting about our depressed feelings, erratic paths of life, and how we fake it but don't make it. That guy had described himself as a crying clown before.

So the movie is certainly hitting a nerve, not just with the two of us, but with many people who feel so powerless and pointless. We also talked about Clockwork Orange right afterwards.

Joker has a tragic weakness that plagues origin stories but which is absent from masterpieces like Clockwork Orange: the protagonist is pathologized. Just when the social critique is about to become interesting, the movie does a full stop to tell us all about Arthur Fleck's childhood and Penny's insanity. What is the purpose of this? Isn't he "sick" enough already as a joyless meek little clown with weird antics and a hidden anger, and who is pushed around literally and figuratively by society?

I don't even know if I expected a deeper comment on the poor vs. rich issue, but this topic and Fleck's personality are devalued by the long psychological digression. Perhaps all the movie needs to be elevated to a higher status is cutting. There was one idea though that was worth exploring: the joker is called a vigilante in one scene, and there are traces of Death Wish. So what if the Joker has a similar motivation to Batman? Wouldn't that be subversive comment of the strongman fantasies that are present not only in politics but also in super"heroes"?

This is an old Hollywood routine, by the way: once a painful truth is uttered, Hollywood doesn't explore it, doesn't even want us to ponder on it, but quickly tells us something about the private evils of the villain who typically told this truth. This method is not necessarily a degradation of Arthur Fleck in Joker's case; but at least it's a distraction.

With all that being said... even with its faults, Joker is more relevant than any movie of recent years. It doesn't work better but it "stings" better.

And I don't think there is a strong violent appeal, as some critics feared. Violence is never glorious in this movie but always dirty. Arthur Fleck stays a lonely schmuck even as a TV personality, and immediately after the cheering crowds, he finds himself in an asylum cell. Even if the murders were shown as fun and aesthetic in a certain way, that wouldn't mean the movie condones or incites violence. Let art be art and don't reduce it to a manual of how to behave upright. Speaking of Clockwork Orange.
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'Well said, alb. I don't have as many positive things to say about the movie yet I largely agree with your take on it, especially wondering if the editing room could elevate this and also this:

There was one idea though that was worth exploring: the joker is called a vigilante in one scene, and there are traces of Death Wish. So what if the Joker has a similar motivation to Batman? Wouldn't that be subversive comment of the strongman fantasies that are present not only in politics but also in super"heroes"? 

Indeed. At some point, especially during the first subway shooting, it reminded me a bit of 'The Brave One' and I thought that it was going to continue on the vigilante line. That would have heightened the social commentary considerably for the reason you so eloquently posited: "Wouldn't that be subversive comment of the strongman fantasies that are present not only in politics but also in super'heroes'?"
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rubyfruit76, Champion

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ElMo, 'well said, as well and as usual. I do agree with some of your review and I am going to take some time to seriously consider the rest because it was very compelling. I try not to read reviews before I see a film but I love reading them afterward and every so often, a review will change how I view a movie. I wonder if yours could do that. I love when that happens. Thank you for giving me something worth pondering.  
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albstein

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By the way, I've just read about a take on Joker in which the main character is a woman working in retail or something, who is constantly told to smile and appear happy, until it makes her go mad. Now that would be an idea.
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15yearsIMDber

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Thanks for your replies, I think it's a credit to the film's subversiveness that it could inspire so many converting and diverging thoughts  (even if some critics might consider the subversive material  superficial and too flashy near the end to be truly effective).

I think we can all agree that the film's first act is an experience that challenges our usual perceptions of what makes a compelling antihero or antivillain for that matter, it's intense and gripping and for all his bizarre manners and manic laughters, Arthur is the kind of guy we want to empathize with, to understand... after all, understanding the roots of evil and violence allows us to better counter-attack them before they lead to chaos. I didn't mention it but I also found some elements of "Fight Club" in the way the whole thing escalated.

However, and that's why I couldn't give a perfect ten, the transition from Joker's soul exploration to the final act is both brutal and abrupt and leaves us with the feeling that there's was a kind of rush in the editing room and some precious ten minutes were missed. Maybe the film could do without the reveal of his pathology or troubled past but then again, I never considered his shyness or pathology as something innate but acquired in a context that many persons living in similar conditions could relate to and from my own experience meeting such people, I didn't feel it contradicted the whole psychological build-up of his personality though (I agree) it wasn't very subtle, but even "Taxi Driver" and "Clockwork" aren't immune to such criticism.

Did Travis really think he could take his girl to a dirty movie and get away with it? Isn't the chain of events that follows Alex De Large's immediate release too contrived to be believable? It's all a matter of plausibility and we either accept it or reject it. There's a moment where "Joker" ceases to be this journey in the hearts of darkness and become a more 'operatic' comment on urban violence, some could see a manipulative attempt to shock audiences under a veil of 'subversive intelligence', and why not? I guess a lesser performance would have harmed the film but Joaquin Phoenix'  impacted me so much that if there ever was a manipulation somewhere, I didn't mind being manipulated... this time. 
(Edited)
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rubyfruit76, Champion

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Joker 5.5/10 although this film brings up a common problem: how does one rate a mediocre movie when a performance is so exceptional? Phoenix was exquisite and although the first third or half of the film was quite good, after the approximate midpoint, I thought "just take Phoenix out and put him in front of a white wall, for all I care, and let him do his thing without all of the unnecessary plot noise and I could watch him for days." The 5.5 might be lower without Phoenix but if a performance justifies a higher score for a movie then Phoenix does so here: I'm just not sure how that would work. I wanted to love this film; why couldn't the filmmaker practice some restraint and trust a compelling character study executed by a masterful, powerful performance? 

Anyway, Phoenix: 10/10
The movie that is a vehicle for this heartbreakingly beautiful performance: 5.5 

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Metropolis (1927) 5 / 10, I'm so disappointed, I know the movie is classic, but this is way too long for how it ends. This is now, for me,  the most overrated film of all time.
(Edited)
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NarniaisAwesome

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His Girl Friday, 4/10.  The beginning is hilarious and Cary Grant is wonderful as always, but unfortunately the movie gets sidetracked from the wacky hijinks and becomes a complicated (and quite annoying) crime/political drama.  Features enough phones to be a commercial for Bell or AT&T.  :/  Also, take off the hats, Rosalind Russell.  You're like Hedda Hopper without the dignity.
(Edited)
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Stephen Atwood

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Last night: finished season 3 Big Mouth (TV Series 2017– ). Had me bawling like a twee baby. 10/10.
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Stephen Atwood

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Tonight: Waka okami wa shôgakusei! (2018)  AKA Okko's Inn. Rented on Amazon Prime, 8/10. It's a tearjerker given it's premise revolves around (not a spoiler) parent's who die in a car accident in the first couple of minutes of the film and the surviving daughter being sent to live with her grandmother, who owns and runs a small bed and bath style hotel.

Bought a preordered ticket (weeks before) way back in January when it came out in its very limited theatrical run in March. Must have been bummed out by ... I can't remember what. Completely forgot I bought the ticket and flaked on the screening. 

Then I read yesterday that it was eligible for next year's Oscar Animated Feature. 

BOLD = SEEN
**** = PLANNING ON SEEING
? = Maybe see it; may not. #shrugs

https://www.cartoonbrew.com/awards/breaking-record-32-animated-features-submitted-for-2020-oscars-181022.html
  • Abominable?
  • The Addams Family
  • The Angry Birds Movie 2
  • Another Day of Life
  • Away
  • Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles****
  • Children of the Sea
  • Dilili in Paris
  • Frozen II****
  • Funan
  • Genndy Tartakovsky’s ‘Primal’ – Tales of Savagery?
  • How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World
  • I Lost My Body****
  • Klaus**** (on Netflix)
  • The Last Fiction
  • The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part
  • Marona’s Fantastic Tale
  • Missing Link
  • Ne Zha
  • Okko’s Inn
  • Pachamama
  • Promare
  • Rezo
  • The Secret Life of Pets 2
  • Spies in Disguise?
  • The Swallows of Kabul****
  • This Magnificent Cake!
  • The Tower
  • Toy Story 4
  • Upin & Ipin: The Lone Gibbon Kris
  • Weathering with You****
  • White Snake


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NarniaisAwesome

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Stephen,
that was a good way of arranging upcoming movies.  My list: 
X = Will not see
! = Will see in theaters
O = Will see on DVD
? = Maybe?

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil = X/O  
(oops, didn't mean to give it a hug and kiss!)
The Lighthouse = O
Zombieland 2: Double Tap = X
Wounds = X 
(sounds good but I can't do cockroaches!!!!!)
The Addams Family = X
Paradise Hills = ?/O
Portals = O
The Great Alaskan Race = O 
(would say theaters but since it's limited mine won't get it)
Terminator: Dark Fate = O
Motherless Brooklyn = X
Arctic Dogs = X
Last Christmas = O 
(purely because I gotta see a WHAM! song come to life)
Midway = X
Doctor Sleep = X
Noelle = O 
(I don't have Disney+)
The Mandalorian = ? (sick of SW but this'll be funny as heck)
Charlie's Angels = X
Frozen 2 = !
A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood = O
Knives Out = O
The Aeronauts = O
Daniel Isn't Real = ?/O
Jumanji: The Next Level = O
Bombshell = X
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker = O w/ RiffTrax commentary
Cats = ? 
1917 = X
Spies in Disguise = X

Well, that pretty much finishes the year.  So.. here it is... if anyone cares.  :D
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NarniaisAwesome

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I must also say that I LOVE the Last Christmas video as it is... so cheesy!  I feel like all it needs is a grizzly bear, yeti, killer, avalanche, or ski lift getting stuck and it becomes an 80's B horror movie!  :D