When is "quotations" an appropriate credit? (Need help from contributors and staff.)

  • 2
  • Question
  • Updated 8 months ago
  • Answered
I'd like the opinion of contributors on this one, and a verdict from the staff.

When is a quotations credit (like the one shown here) legitimate? Tell me how many of the following are acceptable:

1. The quotations credit appears formally in the opening or closing credits.
2. A title card or a subtitle includes a quotation and credits the person who said it.
3. A title card or a subtitle includes a quotation and does not credit the person who said it. (Uncredited.)
4. A title card or a subtitle includes a quotation and credits it to the wrong person. (Credit only.)
5. A character (or newscaster, documentary subject, etc.) quotes someone and credits the person who said it. (In other words, the quotation and the credit are spoken, but not written.)
6. A character quotes someone and does not credit the person who said it. (NOTE: The quotation is presented like a quotation, and not as dialogue the quoter created himself.) (Uncredited.)
7. A character quotes someone and credits it to the wrong person. (Credit only.)
8. A character quotes a catchphrase or a short comment from a notable person with no credit. (Uncredited.)

My opinion:

1. DEFINITELY
2. YES
3. YES
4. YES
5. MAYBE
6. MAYBE
7. MAYBE
8. NO
Photo of J.

J.

  • 410 Posts
  • 623 Reply Likes

Posted 8 months ago

  • 2
Photo of gromit82

gromit82, Champion

  • 7274 Posts
  • 9042 Reply Likes
J.: My opinion is Yes for #1 (normally to be listed as Miscellaneous/Other Crew), No for everything else.

For the reference of other contributors and the staff, for an example of #2, see https://youtu.be/tUN-8TvevGU?t=109, where a David Bowie quote (from the song "Changes") is used as an epigraph for The Breakfast Club, and attributed to Bowie. Bowie does not currently have an IMDb credit for this epigraph, and I don't think he should. 
(Edited)
Photo of gromit82

gromit82, Champion

  • 7274 Posts
  • 9042 Reply Likes
I thought about this some more, and here are my reasons why I voted No for situations #2 through #8. In those situations:
  • The person being quoted normally did not work on the film. In some situations (for example, a quotation from William Shakespeare or Abraham Lincoln), the person might have died before motion pictures were invented.
  • The person being quoted did not receive a regular credit on the film in the opening or closing credits.
  • The length of the quotation written by the person normally would not be long enough that the person would have been entitled to a writing credit, even if the person had actively been working on the film and submitted the quotation to be used in the screenplay. 
Photo of Will

Will, Official Rep

  • 4016 Posts
  • 5201 Reply Likes
Hi J.,

In all of these cases the individual shouldn't be credited in the filmography section. You may record these details (1-4) in the crazy credits section and potentially as a trivia item given the context, but these shouldn't be listed as filmography credits.

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Will