You need to add a way for the reader to fix your writer's mistakes.

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If you read the Biography for Jeffrey Hunter you will notice a mistake. 1.)  How did he film an episode of Star Trek in 1989 when he died in 1968? I believe the digits were transposed by the writer and nobody caught this. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001374/
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Terresa Portal

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Posted 4 years ago

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gromit82, Champion

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Terresa: It is possible to submit corrections to various types of information on IMDb by clicking "Edit page" from most pages on the site. But in this case, there doesn't appear to be a mistake.

IMDb doesn't say that Hunter filmed an episode of "Star Trek" in 1989. Rather, his acting credit for the "Star Trek" episode "The Cage" is the series pilot, which was filmed in 1964 and completed in 1965 but not shown at that time. 

Almost all of the footage from "The Cage" was incorporated into the "Star Trek" episodes "The Menagerie, Parts I and II", which were broadcast in 1966. Hunter has Archive Footage credits for those episodes (because he didn't film any new footage for them -- they just used scenes from the previously existing pilot).

"The Cage" was not distributed to the public in its original format until 1986, when it was released on home video. (And it was first broadcast on television in 1988.)

Even though Jeffrey Hunter died in 1969, the listing of "The Cage" in his filmography under 1986 is correct under IMDb policy.

(By the way, I assume you are referring to Hunter's filmography on IMDb, not his biography. The biography at http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001374/bio doesn't say anything about the 1986 release of "The Cage", and his biographical trivia clearly indicates that he filmed the episode in 1964 even though it wasn't broadcast until 1988.) 
(Edited)
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Dan Dassow, Champion

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gromit82,

As you are aware, this question comes up periodically on the IMDb message boards and on Get Satisfaction.

Probably the definitive answer to this question is on a Star Trek wiki site, Memory Alpha. The article is rather long, but an interesting read for someone who is a true Star Trek fan. The article confirms the history that you provide in your response.

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/The_Cage_%28episode%29
Reception and aftermath
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  • A black-and-white 16mm print of this episode was owned by Gene Roddenberry and was shown by him at speaking engagements and conventions. One of these events was "Tricon" – 1966's World Science Fiction Convention in Cleveland, Ohio – whose attendees included Allan Asherman, a future writer of Star Trek reference works. Due to popular demand, the black-and-white version of this episode was shown after "Where No Man Has Gone Before". (The Star Trek Compendium, 4th ed., pp. 1 & 3) The event was the first convention that Roddenberry took the Star Trek pilots to. (The Star Trek Interview Book, p. 11) Asherman later wrote how he had been impressed by the "serious and imaginative detail" in this episode, a facet he believed it shared with the later pilot. He went on to comment, "In addition there were the laser cannon opticals, the superb Talosian makeups, and another interesting musical score. Its most outstanding characteristics were the intelligence of its story, its polished production values, and the performances of its actors." (The Star Trek Compendium, 4th ed., pp. 1, 3)
  • The master color 35 mm negative of "The Cage" was cut into the master negative of "The Menagerie" in 1966, and the trims not used were subsequently lost. No color or 35mm print of "The Cage" was known to exist, only the black-and-white print owned by Gene Roddenberry, who continued to exhibit the footage at various Star Trek conventions throughout the '70s and early '80s.
  • "The Cage" was initially released on home video in late 1986, in celebration of Star Trek's 20th anniversary. The release was a combination of the color footage used in "The Menagerie" and the additional scenes in Roddenberry's black-and-white print. ("The Menagerie, Part II" text commentary; et al.)
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  • A full-color version of this installment was aired on 4 October 1988, with a two-hour special called The Star Trek Saga: From One Generation To The Next bookending it. The special was hosted by Patrick Stewart and traced the history of Star Trek from "The Cage" throughout the first season of TNG and the beginnings of production for Star Trek V: The Final Frontier. The opportunity to broadcast "The Cage" in its original form came when production of Star Trek: The Next Generation was interrupted due to a Writers' Guild strike. The broadcast filled in for two of the four hours missing from TNG's truncated second season. In some markets, the special (and this episode) did not air until 15 October 1988.
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(Edited)
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gromit82, Champion

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Dan: In fact, I used Memory Alpha as a reference in answering this question, as well as in answering similar questions that have been asked here before (see https://getsatisfaction.com/imdb/topics/star_trek_tos_1966_is_improperly_listed_in_leonard_nimoys_fi...).
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Dan Dassow, Champion

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