Is there a way to keep the listening clock (in my weekly listening report) private?

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  • Updated 7 months ago
  • Under Consideration
If I don't want others to see my listening clock, is that possible? I know I can hide my recent listening history, but I don't know how to do this.
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Bastiaan_M

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  • ok

Posted 1 year ago

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Jan

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I'm guessing, like me, you're not exactly comfortable with people seeing how much you listen on which hours. I for instance don't like people (which includes people who know me in real life) to know I listen to music the entire night through. Don't expect any sympathy here on this platform, you're the outlier, the strange person asking about privacy on last.fm as if it doesn't make sense to be on last.fm and requesting privacy settings. Most here want the opposite, being able to track what users are doing on last.fm.
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Bastiaan_M

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I would just like an option to choose if I want to show it or not, shouldn't be too difficult to implement right?
(Edited)
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Jon, Community & Customer Services

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Official Response
It's not currently possible, but I can raise this with the development team for consideration.  
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Patrick

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Won't something like this kills the spirit of the Community? Hide recent activities for me is more than enough.
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Jan

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Spirit of the community?? What do you mean? What is this "spirit"? You need to be able to see when users listen on a circular graph to uphold this spirit then?
(Edited)
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Jon, Community & Customer Services

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We have to weigh that against people not scrobbling or self-censoring their scrobbles due to privacy concerns, which is equally detrimental to the 'spirit' of last.fm.  Ideally we want people to be comfortable scrobbling their entire music taste and listening habits to the site, but we also have to respect that music is very personal and not everyone is comfortable sharing everything they listen to in a public space (whether that's the last.fm community or the world at large).  We're not going to fundamentally change how Last.fm works (it will remain an 'open' network -- as opposed to say facebook which is 'closed' and you let people in), nor is it practical to put every setting, widget, or scrobble behind a customisation/privacy toggle, so it's comes down striking a balance between what's reasonable and expected from the majority of users and what's not.  This is of course separate from our legal obligations concerning user privacy, which are more clear cut.

In this case, I can see how publicly displaying when you're statistically most likely to be awake or sleeping could become a privacy concern, and is an unintended consequence of the listening clock module.  I think it's worth at least discussing, hence raised for consideration.
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Jan

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To be clear, I'm all open for sharing what I'm listening to. How much I listen to artist X or track Y or where my preferences lie, that's not an issue for me. I'm a long time user, member for 10 years and over (100% legit) 300.000 scrobbles. I have no issue at all with sharing all of that. The issue with me when listening activity can be connected to a time and a location. The listening clock does just that. It's a valid concern and since last.fm already permits to not show recent listening it would make sense to also allow for an option to not disclose week listening habits.
Furthermore I doubt something like this would impact "the spirit" of last.fm if blocking recent listening is any indication then only a minority of users will choose to block their listening clock. I block my recent listening and I rarely see other users doing the same. I'd estimate less than 5% do it.
(Edited)
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Elliot Robinson

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If people are really that interested in your listening activity, they could look at your scrobbles which are all time-stamped anyway, no? I can see how the clock gives an easier, at-a-glance, average impression, but it seems secondary to the scrobble data itself.

As I said in another thread on a similar privacy issue, it seems like the most sensible course of action would be to have an Instagram-style private profile option. It means there isn't the need for endless individual widgets and people like Bastiaan, Jan and others, can lock their account and not have to worry about prying eyes.
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Jon, Community & Customer Services

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>>>The issue with me when listening activity can be connected to a time and a location. The listening clock does just that. It's a valid concern and since last.fm already permits to not show recent listening it would make sense to also allow for an option to not disclose week listening habits. 

Yes, I agree that's a valid concern and have already communicated it to the product team. I was mainly responding to Patrick's post.
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Kamil

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Hide Listening Reports from profile.

I can't see an option to hide Listening Reports from profile - could you provide me with a link where I can find it? I don't see a reason why the whole world must see exactly which hours I am online listening or which days I am listening to music mostly.

Thank you
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Bastiaan_M

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Any progress with the consideration so far?
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Bastiaan_M

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This considerating is taking a long time guys. I can inform you that I'm now censoring my scrobbles sometimes because of this. I'm probably not the only one that does that.
(Edited)
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Jan

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Far from it you're not the only one. About censoring scrobbles if I were to use the people who follow me as an example I'd say about 10% of users do this myself included.