Photosynth Ubuntu Support

  • Problem
  • Updated 5 years ago
Your awesomeness program doesn't support the ubuntu firefox.

Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it Fix it

Please!

I don't care right now if microsoft bought it, stole it, or made it, as long as they'll let me use it.
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  • frustrated

Posted 6 years ago

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David Gedye, Principal Group Manager

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Sorry -- we only run on Windows (vis Direct3D and Silverlight) and Mac (via Silverlight). Due to the need to have pretty sophisticated 3D, porting it to Linux would require some dedicated linux or OpenGL programming. We can't sign up for that.
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Nathanael Lawrence

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Jacob,

The experimental Silverlight Photosynth viewer may work for you when the Moonlight 2.0 Beta comes out in May. If Moonlight 2.0 Beta doesn't run it, then the final release in September 2009 should definitely work for you. For more details, please visit the Moonlight Roadmap
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Nathanael Lawrence

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Jacob, Moonlight 2.0 was finally released from beta on December 17.

Sadly, for you, the Photosynth viewer is now a Silverlight 3 application and Moonlight 2 only fully supports Silverlight 2 apps. The Moonlight team is hard at work on Moonlight 3 preview, in order to be compatible with the winter Olympics site by February and Photosynth is high on their list of things to get working too, but it may be a few more months for you.

David, I know you could say the word and have the Silverlight 2 viewer served up to machines running Firefox for Linux until the Moonlight team can catch up. How about a little cross-platform goodwill in the spirit of the holidays and new year?
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hey guys - i use ubuntu only - and its really sad that photosynth is not functioning here.
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Jaap-Willem Dooge

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Same problem, it's too up to date.

Wanted to use this great technology but well, i have to wait i guess.
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Nathanael Lawrence

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Hey, guys, you can try the Moonlight 3 alpha, if you like. (Considering that it's alpha quality, though, and that no posts have been made from the Moonlight guys saying that Photosynths now work, don't hold your breath.)

As I linked to above, the Moonlight team is prioritizing their work on whatever will get the major Silverlight apps up first and the Photosynth viewer is on that list.

For more news, I'd recommend keeping an eye out for Moonlight 3 and 4 posts on Miguel de Icaza's blog.

As I've noted elsewhere, having Moonlight running the Photosynth viewer correctly still only lets you view synths. Making them is only achieved via the standalone synther app which only runs under Windows.

If you'd like to use Noah Snavely's Bundler, which is GPL licensed Linux code, you can download it for free. It hasn't undergone the optimizations that the Photosynth synther has, nor does it output data in Photosynth's format (to my knowledge), but it will run where you want it to. The other downside is that I don't think that the University of Washington makes their Photo Tourism viewer available, so viewing the results is up to you to figure out. Check out Binary Millenium's Bundler post that I link to below to get a heads up.

On a different tangent, and in the spirit of open source, you could look into getting the Linux community to build your own Photosynth viewer that loads synths from the official Photosynth site. Both the co-ordinate data and the multiscale image formats are fairly well understood.

In fact the iSynth app for the iPhone and iPod Touch doesn't use Silverlight or Direct3D as both of the official Photosynth viewers have.

For more information on the coordinate data, see Christoph Hausner's Photosynth Pointcloud Exporter as well as Binary Millenium's blog posts about Bundler and Photosynth pointclouds.

For information on how Deep Zoom images work, you can reference the Developer section at Seadragon.com, this MSDN article, or this blog post on the Deep Zoom Blog.

For a head start on building your own tool that generates Deep Zoom Images and Collections, see this list of third party tools.

For how to build your own Deep Zoom Image viewer, look up Daniel Gasienica's OpenZoom viewer, which is open source and already reads DZIs. For that matter, you can also see what the Seadragon team themselves did with Seadragon AJAX and use concepts learned from OpenZoom and the ASP.net version of Seadragon AJAX to build your own Deep Zoom viewer. It would be truly interesting to see the Linux community build their own OpenGL Photosynth viewer.

As a random bonus, here are API links relating to: the webservice that the official synther uses and Javascript calls to interact with the Photosynth viewer.