Is Quicken for Mac 2007 (QM2007) Compatible with Mojave (macOS 10.14)?

  • 9
  • 5
  • Question
  • Updated 4 weeks ago
  • In Progress
  • (Edited)
It seems Apple has announced today @WWDC that macOS 10.14 (Mojave) will definitely be the last version to support 32-bit applications. 
https://www.macrumors.com/2018/06/05/mojave-last-macos-release-to-support-32-bit-apps/

This suggests that QM2007 might still run on macOS 10.14, at least theoretically. Time will tell once it is released in final form.

This discussion thread is to capture user's experiences with running QM2007 on Mojave (macOS 10.14). Please record your info below, indicating what issues or successes you are having.

Click FOLLOW above to be sure to get updated info on user results.
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 303,410 Points 100k badge 2x thumb

Posted 8 months ago

  • 9
  • 5
Photo of jlgg

jlgg

  • 1,242 Points 1k badge 2x thumb
Tonight I installed Mojave 10.14 Beta on an external drive. I opened QM2007.  All accounts and past transactions seem intact. The problems began with newly entered data. 

1)  Downloaded today's security quotes. A popup appeared saying the prices could not be saved. Quit the program, re-opened, and today's quotes had indeed disappeared. Repeated the process several times to verify. All past quotes and transaction history are intact.

2)  Tried entering new transactions in different account registers. A similar popup saying the transaction could not be saved appeared.  However, upon quitting and reopening the program, the new transactions were retained.

Obviously this is just a Beta release, and we'll have to hope future updates may correct these issues.
Photo of jlgg

jlgg

  • 1,242 Points 1k badge 2x thumb
Running on APFS formatted drive. I was already using APFS and running under High Sierra without issue except for the widely noted automatic back-up issues.

 It is my understanding that Mojave 10.14 will automatically convert all HFS+ drives to AFPS, so it may not be possible to run Quicken 2007 on an HFS+ drive in Mojave. I can't verify this.

If someone has success in doing this, I would be interested in knowing how they accomplished installing Mojave on an HFS+ partition.
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 107,010 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Well, there's the possibility that it will behave differently if the data file is on an HFS+ external drive, or an HFS+ partition of an APFS drive (assuming the latter is even allowed by Mojave). And there's also the possibility that the problems observed so far have nothing to do with APFS. Or that subsequent iterations of Mojave will work better with Quicken 2007. Many variables...

Nonetheless, those sticking with Quicken 2007 for a bit longer might be wise to update their Mac to the latest version of High Sierra by August, and then skip upgrading to Mojave and beyond. Meanwhile, hopefully, the next year or so will bring enough enhancements to the modern Quicken to allow most of us to finally let go of Quicken 2007. (One can hope, can't one?)
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 301,500 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Converting to APFS is the default in beta 1 with no options to override. But IIRC, the same was true with High Sierra then Apple added the option. Only time will tell.
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 107,010 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Apple clearly wants to move everything forward to APFS, so it's unlikely they'll provide an option not to on fusion boot drives unless they again run into any problems they can't solve by the release date. I'd guess they've worked out the issues from a year ago.

One question, in terms of Quicken 2007, is whether Mojave still supports creating HFS+ external drives and or HFS+ partitions on an APFS-formatted drive. And another is whether anything other than automatic backups is affected by being on an HFS+ drive versus an APFS drive. (That is, there may be other issues with Quicken 2007 on Mojave that are not related to the drive's format.)
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 301,500 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Agreed. We will have to wait and see which direction they take.
Photo of Gary Thompson

Gary Thompson

  • 60 Points
I also upgraded to the Mojave beta (build 18A314k) and Quicken opened with no problem. I added a transaction to 2 different accounts, both times getting the not able to save message. When I closed and reopened Quicken, the transactions were, indeed, gone. Now every time I try to open Quicken, it quits instantly. I installed Quicken 2007 on my laptop with High Sierra (10.13.5) and tried to open my original file. Neither my original file, nor any of the backups will open on the laptop. I get an Unable To Load error on every file I try. As of now, I have no Quicken and no data. Any ideas?
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 106,318 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Backups.

If you don't have backups, and you're using an early beta of a new operating system, which always has problem of some sort, then you really pushed your luck -- maybe too far.

Hopefully you have a backup copy of your data file from before this Mojave test, as well as a backup of the Quicken program. Make a copies of them and put them on your laptop, and the Quicken 2007 application and your pre-Mojave data file should work fine there.
Photo of Scott Saylor

Scott Saylor

  • 1,102 Points 1k badge 2x thumb
I'm running QM 2018 5.6.3 (Build 56.22447.100) and recently installed Mac OS Mojave 10.14 Beta (18A314k) on a late 2014 Mac Mini 2.6 GHz i5. The root drive was converted to APFS but 3 external Seagate USB drives (media, backup & spare) were left alone in HFS+. The media drive was mounted in the upgrade (presumably because of iTunes & Photos libraries) but the backup and spare drives were left unmounted. I just mounted them both and am doing a backup so it looks like everything is functional for me.  
Photo of Jill15

Jill15

  • 172 Points 100 badge 2x thumb
It will not do it automatically because I have Mojave. That is what the message said
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 298,270 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Are you sure you have QM2017? This thread is about QM2007...

If you truly have QM2017, I would contact Quicken Support as this should not be an issue.
https://www.quicken.com/contact-support

There are also 2 more official Quicken #'s:
Though they no longer publish it, the same old toll-free number they have always had is still valid for non-premium memberships: 1-888-311-7276
For premium memberships, you have to look up the number in your Quicken.com account. This will give you front-of-the-line service (using same reps).

Also note that legitimate phone support is only available Mon-Fri 5am to 5 pm Pacific time. Chat is available 24x7.

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 106,318 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Jill, could you please clarify if you have Quicken 2017 (what you typed) or Quicken 2007 (which can't do automatic backups on Mojave). Based on your answer, we can direct you in the right direction.
Photo of Jill15

Jill15

  • 172 Points 100 badge 2x thumb
Sorry, I have Quicken 2007
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 298,270 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Your options are:
  1. turn off automatic backups in QM2007, and rely on manual backups or other software to perform backups, .e.g. Time Machine,
  2. get or create a HFS+ (Mac OS Extended) drive/partition and store both the active file and backups on that drive/partition.
for 1. open Preferences in QM2007 a unselect automatic backups:



for 2. get an external drive and format it as HFS+ (Mac OS Extended) if it is not already, using Apple Disk Utility OR create a HFS+ partition on your existing drive using the same tool.

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
 
Photo of jlgg

jlgg

  • 1,242 Points 1k badge 2x thumb
I installed the latest Mojave Beta tonight on an external drive formatted with AFPS.  Quicken 2007 is now running exactly as it has been in High Sierra. The issues I had on earlier betas with Quicken not saving new transactions and downloaded quotes is fixed. 
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 301,500 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Not over complicating anything...these are all the scenarios and details needed to navigate options, as people have many different configurations. My configuration happens to touch all 4 points (I have multiple internal and external drives). So far, you have, and the articles have, offered ways to address some of the scenarios. 

As per your reply, you are suggesting that Apple is confirming that the Mojave installer will convert any drive onto which it is installed, whether internal or external. This would cover point 1 (already confirmed) and 3. I have not seen the wording myself, so some objective confirmation would be good.

That still also leaves points 2 and 4 to confirm, as without that info, it is not possible to know if such as drastic work around as you have suggested is required.

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 107,010 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
I understand you may have multiple drives, but the issue here is about drives which have macOS Mojave installed. If you have external drives which are just data drives, with no OS, then they won't be converted to APFS. (To be certain, I'd just unplug them while installing Mojave; I'd do that with any OS install, regardless of this concern.) If you have external drives where you install the OS so they're bootable drives, then they will be converted to APFS as part of the installation of Mojave.

I guess I can't speak with certainty about the very unusual -- in modern Mac hardware terms -- secondary internal drive. I would think the Mojave installer wouldn't touch such a drive. To be safe, you could unmount it with Disk Utility prior to installing Mojave.

Sources of information on this subject include this ArsTechnica report on Mojave, which plainly states:
Any Mac that wasn’t automatically switched to APFS last year will get switched when you upgrade to Mojave—even installing Mojave on an external HFS+ volume now converts it to APFS. This includes Macs with spinning hard drives (mostly older Macs, though some current iMacs and Mac Minis still ship with HDDs, weird as that is for top-shelf computers in 2018) and Fusion Drives. That’s good news for anyone with a Fusion Drive, since Apple implemented some APFS features specifically to benefit them.
From Apple's support pages, here:

Are you about to install macOS High Sierra or later on the disk?
If you need to erase your disk before installing High Sierra or later for the first time on that disk, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled). During installation, the macOS installer decides whether to automatically convert to APFS—without erasing your files:
  • macOS Mojave: The installer converts from Mac OS Extended to APFS.
  • macOS High Sierra: The installer converts from Mac OS Extended to APFS only if the volume is on an SSD or other all-flash storage device. Fusion Drives and traditional hard disk drives (HDDs) aren't converted. 
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 301,500 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Great. Thx for the extra confirming info. 

I am well aware of work-arounds to either avoid or force the situations one way or the other. Keep in mind that I am not just asking the questions for myself but for anyone reading/following this thread. I was simply using myself as an example, as I suspect there are others out there.

So, so far what we have for sure is confirmation for point 1 and 3 but still no confirmation regarding 2 and 4, with the work-around to simply unmount or disconnect those drives.

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 107,010 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Well, we can keep going around about this, but I believe it's pretty clear that the drive onto which you are installing the Mojave OS is converted to APFS, and other drives are not affected. Apple can't presume to know if you're going to use an external drive with an older Mac that doesn't support APFS, or plan to use it for Time Machine (which still requires HFS+). I have never read anything, under High Sierra or Mojave, which says installing the OS will change the format of other drives -- and for the aforementioned reasons, I'm sure this would have been discussed somewhere if the installer actually did change other drives at the same time as installing the new OS. So I'm bowing out of the conversation; I think the question has been answered.

(And since running Quicken 2007 still works, minus one minor feature, on Mojave... and since there are multiple ways to get back to HFS+ on a drive/partition other than the startup drive if need be... I don't think it's worth belaboring. If you disagree, I'm sure you'll carry on! ;) 
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 301,500 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
I believe in full disclosure so users can make informed decisions. 

You have supplied some good info but have not pointed out a single corroborating statement that confirms "... and other drives are not affected. "  AND Apple has many times made changes without warning to users. So I am not belabouring anything...I am simply documenting all possible scenarios without presumption.

So as such, unless you have other evidence, points 2 and 4 remain unconfirmed. 
(Edited)
Photo of Don Goldberg

Don Goldberg

  • 92 Points 75 badge 2x thumb
This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Does Quicken for Mac 2007 run on macOS Mojave (10.14) released September 24, 2018....

I would like to hear your experience.
Photo of DD LLOYD

DD LLOYD

  • 102 Points 100 badge 2x thumb
I have been able to do everything as before (including going nuts over periodic crashing) but am no longer able to back-up my data in any way, neither externally nor on my desktop.
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 106,318 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
@DD Lloyd: Automatic backups from Quicken 2007 do not work on any hard drive formatted in the new Apple APFS format. But it's easy to manually make backups: just quit Quicken, find your data file in the finder, and Duplicate it. (You may want to edit the name to reflect the date of the backup, such as "10-22-2018 My Data". Also, if you use Apple's Time Machine to back up your Mac on an ongoing basis -- you do this, don't you? (grin) -- your Quicken data file is being backed up. Another option: if you have or get an inexpensive external hard drive, and format it as HFS+ instead of APFS, and put your Quicken data file and backup folder on the HFS+ drive, then Quicken 2007 automated backups will continue to work.

The loss of the automated backup from within Quicken 2007 is a minor inconvenience. For those still using Quicken 2007, it's remarkable that this is the only part of Quicken which doesn't work on the modern High Sierra or Mojave operating systems. 
Photo of Digger

Digger

  • 350 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
I too got the 'Quicken was unable to automatically backup your file' message on closing Quicken 2007 for Mac 16.2.4 after upgrading to Mojave 10.14.  Auto Backup was working fine before the upgrade.

Re-opened, made changes and selected File / Backup to disk from the pull down menu - the backup completed successfully and file size increased from 43.9M to 44.5M.
Re-opened and confirmed the changes made were saved.  Wish I'd checked this forum before upgrading to Mojave - brain cramp.  Yes, I have Time Machine doing regular backups too.
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 298,270 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Looks like you have everything under control now. You can always choose to create an HFS+ partition or use an external drive if this feature is important to you. Otherwise, you are good to go.

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
Photo of Scott Schmidt

Scott Schmidt

  • 972 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
I have tested it on Mojave and so far it seems to work fine except for the auto backup problem on APFS drives that also existed under High Sierra.
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 298,270 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Yes, you can read all about that here:
Is Quicken for Mac 2007 Compatible with High Sierra (macOS 10.13)?

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
Might someone respond in simple english (ie for us non-tech folks)- will Quicken 2007 work with the final (not Beta) Mojave? Thanks!
Photo of Scott Schmidt

Scott Schmidt

  • 972 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
I have tried it on my MacBook Pro and my Mac Pro and so far it works just like it did in High Sierra, which is fine, except that auto-backups won't work.  I have seen other similar reports.  Hope this helps.
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
Thanks Scott! So basically, if it works just like it did in High Sierra, that means that there's a message auto-backups won't work, though when I close the app it saves the new data. Right?
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 106,318 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Ruth, yes, this is what a few people have reported. (One small correction to your question: "when I close the app it saves the new data. Right?" Actually, data in Quicken is saved each time you press Enter/Return to complete entering or editing a transaction.)

Of course, Quicken 2007 is no longer supported by Quicken, so the company does not testing and doesn't make any compatibility announcements. (And everyone using Quicken 2007 should be aware that it definitely will NOT work on the next version of macOS that comes out next September, due to changes Apple has clearly communicated.)
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
Thanks for this.
Photo of Scott Schmidt

Scott Schmidt

  • 972 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
That's right, Ruth.  Of course all of the transactions you enter are saved, but the auto-backup that makes a copy of your entire file doesn't work because of the new APFS disk format with Mojave.  However, you can just make a copy of the file yourself if you want to be sure you have a backup.

I tested QM2007 with Mojave pretty extensively on my spare machine before upgrading my main Mac where I use it (and have for a very long time).  But I think that after Mojave, it will no longer be possible due to more fundamental changes in the MacOS, so this is probably the last time it will work.  To carry on further will require the new Quicken, which in my opinion is not nearly as good as the old QM2007 (in fairness it is slowly improving...), but at least it will be sustainable for many years as opposed to now, when we all hold our breath every time a new MacOS comes out.  Good luck.
(Edited)
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
Thanks again, Scott. I'm just hoping that before the new MacOS comes out that Quicken will have developed a better alternative. I bought the latest version and then sent it back within a day - Even though I don't use any of the online features, it didn't even seem to have the ability to easily convert other currencies by using the QuickMath function. A huge issue for me. Really appreciate your input!
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 106,318 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
I also very much want them to implement some equivalent to QuickMath in the modern Quicken Mac. I hope you'll take a second to click over to this idea thread and click the blue Vote button at the upper right to add your vote for this feature. the more people who vote, the higher the likelihood the developers will tackle it.

I'm not sure when you last tried the modern Quicken Mac, but they did implement enhanced multi-currency functionality in Quicken 2018. Here's a post which summarizes what is, and is not, implemented in supporting multiple currencies currently.
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
I went ahead and clicked on the blue vote button and also read the post that summarized the multi-currency function. Am not clear how it works though if "foreign" purchases are not included in totals. For my needs, it really doesn't matter what currency the expenses are make in (ie shekels, euro, pounds, USD) but I'd like them all to show up in the registers as USD so that the totals will reflect all of them. Does this make sense?
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 298,270 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
NO version of Quicken for Mac has ever supported multi-currency. So whatever you are doing to track transactions in foreign currencies, you can still do in the current version. 

Though the current Mac version allows recording the exchange rate for a transaction, whatever currency the transaction is recorded in is the amount that will show up in reports, investments, etc. It will not converted the transactions to the home currency at the moment. So you will have to make manual adjustments to have all foreign currency transactions reflected in your home currency, just like you may have always done.

HTH

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
Actually, what I've been doing for years now is using quick math to do the exchange so that all amounts show up in usd. i.e. if I input 20 £  and I've set up quickmath with the latest exchange rate, I can simply input 20p and it is automatically converted to USD. Does the latest version have quickmath or another way to similarly easily convert to the home currency?
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 298,270 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Only manually... just type the amount then * then the exchange rate. No shortcut unless you use some third party utility to mimic QuickMath.

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
Photo of Scott Schmidt

Scott Schmidt

  • 972 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
Ruth, you can be sure that Quicken won't develop any new product since their strategy is set.  However,  they are continuing to improve the new Quicken and I would suggest that you plan on transitioning to it at some point unless you want to keep your Mac stuck on Mojave forever.  Importing your QM2007 data file is easy, although I have had issues with it for investment transactions.  It is quite different in appearance, and still lacks some features that you are used to, but slowly I see them being added.  Switching to another program altogether isn't a good option, because importing old Quicken data into them can be risky, and most don't have the feature set of Quicken.  My strategy has been to buy the new Quicken and continue to try/learn/monitor it and then make the switch when the old QM2007 no longer runs on the MacOS.  In this way, you can be assured of many more years of use, and importantly, all of your data will be in one continuous record, which is a huge reason for using personal finance software anyways.  It's a little difficult, but eventually, as with many changes, you will eventually look back and be glad you made the change.  Good luck!
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
This all makes sense. I've never figured out how to track investments with Quicken so all I use it for is to keep track of expenses and income. However, since many of my expenses are in different currencies (I live abroad yet still use the USD as my "main" currency in terms of inputting into Quicken) I would want it to at the very least be able to easily convert from shekels to dollars, and then to include every purchase, regardless of original currency in calculating the balance in each account as well as in monthly reports. Do you know if this is possible in the new version? (Or perhaps I should move this question to another page?) I very much appreciate your input!
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 298,270 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
And yes, this is getting off topic...If you need more help on this or other topics, please do start another thread. ;-)
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
You're right. Will do. Thanks for the reminder.
Photo of Scott Schmidt

Scott Schmidt

  • 972 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
I've never used the foreign currency part, but understand the need having lived in the UK for a long time.  Others can surely fill you in on that feature.  
Photo of Scott Kruer

Scott Kruer

  • 226 Points 100 badge 2x thumb
I have the current iMac with a flash 1TB APFS formatted internal drive and an external HDD where I keep my time machine and video files ( as well as my Quicken file). I am running Mojave 10.14 . EVERYTHING WORKS! The next system upgrade will surely kill QM2007 because it will only run 64bit programs (QM2007 is 32bit and Mojave gives me a warning ever so often to update the program)

Photo of Carl

Carl

  • 72 Points
since several have hijacked this post for their own issues... has anyone other the Mr Kruer  installed Mojave 10.14 and found Quicken 7 still functional?

Hello Mr Mayer??
smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

(Edited)
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 298,270 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Sorry, I have not tried it. My 2010 i7 iMac computer is not supported by Mojave so I cannot try even if I wanted. I have to upgrade my iMac first. :-\
Photo of Scott Schmidt

Scott Schmidt

  • 972 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
Take my word for it folks.  Quicken mac runs just fine on Mojave, except that the auto-backup doesn't work because of the APFS disk format.  I've been using it for days on Mojave with no problems.  True, there are some functions I have not tried, but the basics of ledgers, calendars, reporting, plots, all work fine as far as I can see.
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 298,270 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
So we have 3 "Scots", a "jigg" and Mojave... sounds like the development of a new joke ;-)   (pardon my liberty).

@Carl as you can see from above there are several users that have tried this so far with good success.

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
Hi Carl,
I've installed Mojave on my 2015 macbook pro and it seems to work fine. Just like it did on High Sierra. hth.
Photo of John Prewitt

John Prewitt

  • 792 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
Before Time Machine was on the Mac, the auto backup feature in Quicken 2007 was necessary. Now since Quicken 2007 can't preform Autobackup you can go to the Preferences for Quicken 2007 and uncheck the auto backup feature.  You can obtain backup version of your data file via Time Machine. Remember that Quicken 2007 would create a backup once to either quit Quicken 2007 or opened a new data file. It may take Time Machine up to an hour to create a backup.
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 302,460 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Time Machine may work for some but not others. It needs an external drive, which not everyone has. So automatic backups are still useful.

For those uses, they may still opt to create an HFS+ (Mac OS Extended) format partition or drive and store their data files and backups there to continue to use this feature.
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 107,364 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Two comments...

(1) Quicken 2007 can still perform auto-backups, for those who want them, as long as the data file is installed on an HFS+ formatted drive. For those who have upgraded to Mojave and had their internal drive changed over to APFS format, this can be done either by partitioning an internal drive into a small second partition formatted as HFS+ and moving the Quicken data file there, or putting the Quicken data file on an external drive formatted as HFS+.

(2) Time Machine is great, and I recommend it for all Mac users. Yet as inexpensive as external hard drives are, not everyone has an external disk they use for Time Machine. And even or those of us who do, I believe there is no such thing as too many backups. I make manual backups of my Quicken data file from time to time, just to have copies that will outlive Time Machine deleting old ones. (Remember that while Time Machine starts out making hourly backups, after a day it retains only the first backup per day, and after a month, only the first backup per week. And if your Time Machine hard drive gets full, it deletes the oldest files to create free space.) I also make a whole-disk backup on an external hard drive periodically and store it in a different location than my home as protection against a disaster that could claim my computer and Time Machine drive in one incident.
Photo of John Prewitt

John Prewitt

  • 792 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
Moving just the Quicken Backup Folder to an external USB drive whose format is MS-DOS (FAT32) and selecting it via the Choose icon in Quicken 2007 preference does not work. Moving both the original and backup data files to an external drive works.
(Edited)
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 107,376 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Yes, as noted multiple times above, the Quicken data file and backup folder must be on a non-APFS drive. (I'd normally say it must be on an HFS+ drive; I'm surprised it works okay on a FAT32-formatted drive; I'd still strongly recommend HFS+.)

Speaking of FAT32, I'd mention that it's not wise to put your live Quicken data file on a flash drive (which often come formatted as FAT32) -- they're fine for moving a file from one computer to another, or even for short-term backup, but flash drives are not well-suited to running database programs which do a lot of writing to a disk. (Inexpensive flash drives are typically slower, but more importantly, flash solid-state media has a finite number of erase cycles, and a database that's constantly updating data does a lot of erasing/rewriting to the drive.)
Photo of LeRoy E. Ostrus

LeRoy E. Ostrus

  • 136 Points 100 badge 2x thumb
It seems that after installing the Mojave OS on my I'Mac, that Quicken 2007 will no longer save a backup.  However, it still retains all of the newly entered data, including stock quotes, contrary to what another post seemed to indicate.  What I do now for back-up is to save a copy of my data file to a back-up file both on my desk top and to Apple's iCloud.  Is there any thought given to releasing  an update to Quicken 2007 in order to deal with the Mojave  OS?
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 108,050 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
LeRoy, yes the automatic backup functionality fails on any hard drive formatted in Apple’s new APFS format; this started last year with the High Sierra operating system.As you note, the easiest solution is to make manual backup copies from time to time. If you use Apple’s Time Machine for automated backups, that’s an extra layer of protection. (Or you can put your Quicken data file and backups on an external drive formatted in the older HFS+ format.)There is a *zero* percent chance of Quicken releasing an update to Quicken 2007. That program has long since been discontinued, and all their efforts are focused on enhancing the current Quicken Mac program. Quicken 2007 will completely stop running on Apple’s next operating system next fall. By then, the Quicken Mac developers hope to have addressed the key features a significant number of remaining 2007 users are still holding out for.
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
I'm not understanding something here. I'm using Quicken 2007 with Mojave, and every time I quit Quicken, even with that error message, the backup has registered all of the changes I've made during that session. It's just that I don't now have multiple backups from each time I quit quicken. Is it that other users have a need for these older backups?
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 108,050 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
All the data is fine in your actual Quicken data file. If you have your data file on a drive formatted as APFS — which is the case for most people with Mojave —Quicken attempts to make a backup but fails. (If you have your data file and backup folder on HFS+ formatted drive, the automatic backup will still work.)Ruth, I’m skeptical that your Quicken is actually generating a complete backup file. Are you saying that you have opened one of the automatically-generated backup files, and found it to be intact, and then gone back to your live data file? Or are you just seeing a file with the date and time you quit Quicken? If the latter, the file you’re seeing like isn’t a complete backup at all.You can manually make a backup in Quicken, or simply quit Quicken and then duplicate the data file in the Finder. In Quicken, you can go to preferences and turn off the automatic backups, since they’re not working anyway.
Photo of Ruth Hirsch

Ruth Hirsch

  • 294 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
Jacobs, what I mean is that when I  click on the document that quicken automatically updates upon quitting (Quicken titled it: 111222121.QuickenData.qdfm- the file indicates it was Created on 6.29.10 (years after I started using Quicken) and updated today- Quicken again opens but with the data I've input earlier. Are you saying that this is not a trustworthy backup? btw, I update weekly with both Time Machine and SuperDuper.

Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 108,050 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
Ruth, if it's a document that exists before you launch Quicken, and gets an update time after you quit Quicken, that sounds like it is your live Quicken data file, not a backup copy. (Backups are new files created in a designated folder after you quite Quicken.)

The naming of your file is interesting. Quicken prepends a digit when it makes backups. So if your data file is named "QuickenData.qdfm", when Quicken 2007 makes a backup, it will be named "1QuickenData.qdfm". The next day*, it will rename that file "2QuickenData.qdfm" and create a new backup called "1QuickenData.qdfm". The next day, it will rename "2QuickenData.qdfm" to "3QuickenData.qdfm", rename "1QuickenData.qdfm" to "2QuickenData.qdfm", and create a new backup called, again, "1QuickenData.qdfm". This continues up to the maximum number you have set in your Quicken Preferences for backups, a maximum of 9. (*Quicken 2007 creates backup files with a frequency set in Preferences: you can have it set to make a backup every 'x' times you quit Quicken, so if you have it set to "every 1 time", and you open and quit Quicken 5 times in one day, it will make 5 backups that day. I have mine set to "every 2 times", and to retain 9 backups.)

If you at some point open one of those backup files instead of your live "QuickenData.qdfm" data file, the naming gets interesting. Let's say you open "1QuickenData.qdfm" by double-clicking on it. It looks exactly as you'd expect, because it's an exact copy of your Quicken data file. Now when it makes its automated backup, it again prepends a digit, creating "11QuickenData.qdfm". The next backup will be "21QuickenData.qdfm", then "31QuickenData.qdfm" and so on. As long as you open a backup that begins with a 1, you're opening the most recent backup, so you're probably not losing any transactions; if you open a backup that begins with a 2, then you will have lost any changes you made -- if any -- since that backup was made 2 times ago.

Is sounds like you have repeatedly -- over time that may span months or years -- opened Quicken backup files. The "111222121" in front of your data file name seems to indicate you have opened a backup on 8 different occasions over time. You started with "QuickenData.qdfm" and then opened a backup file named "1QuickenData.qdfm". That file created a "11QuickenData.qdfm" backup followed by a "21QuickenData.qdfm" backup. You opened that "21QuickenData.qdfm" data file, so the next backup it created was "121QuickenData.qdfm". You opened that file, so the next backup it created was "1121QuickenData.qdfm", followed by "2121QuickenData.qdfm". You opened that backup, and Quicken created the next backup named "12121QuickenData.qdfm" -- and so on until you reach the file name you have today.

Here's my suggestion. Identify the most recent file, and rename it to simply "QuickenData.qdfm". Going forward, make sure that's the only file you're opening, and that the date modified is changing for this file after you've used it. If you weren't on an APFS-formatted disk, Quicken would go back to naming backups "1QuickenData.qdfm", "2QuickenData.qdfm", "3QuickenData.qdfm", etc. -- but because this feature doesn't work on High Sierra or Mojave systems with APFS hard drives, you'll just get the error message that Quicken was unable to make an automatic backup.

Now go into Quicken Preferences, and in the File Backup setting, uncheck the checkbox to automatically make backups. This tells Quicken not to try to make backups, so you won't get the error message. Now, adopt a system for periodically making manual backups. What I do is create a folder called "QuickenData Backups". After you quit Quicken, right-click on your "QuickenData.qdfm" file and select Duplicate (or click on the file to select it and press Command-D to duplicate). This will create a copy named "QuickenData copy.qdfm". I edit the name to include the date: "2018-10-23 QuickenData.qdfm", and then drag this file into the backups folder.

Is it necessary to make the manual backups? No. You're using Time Machine to backup your Mac's files, which is good, and you're making SuperDuper whole disk backups as an additional layer of security, which is great. Do you need yet another layer of backups of your Quicken file? Maybe not. Probably not. But I'll explain why you might want to do it anyway. I like to do it because (a) you can never have too many backups when something goes south, and (b) since Quicken 2007's database is prone to occasional data loss or corruption, having manual backups every week or so going back in time could prove helpful in the event Quicken mangles some of your data. (I have a chunk of transactions in one particular account which Quicken inexplicably moved to dates a few years earlier; I was only able to pin down what happened by going back through my manual backups to find when the corruption occurred and what data had changed.) Time Machine is great, but it's important to know that it isn't always retaining a backup you might want. Time Machine backups up your files hourly, but it only retains the first backup of a day for the next month. so if you used Quicken for awhile, or several times, on a day, the Time Machine backup of your Quicken data file for that day isn't a backup of your ending data file for that day, it's the backup it made in the hour after you first modified it. Then, after a month, it only preserves the first backup of a week. If your Time Machine disk ever fills up, it then starts deleting the oldest weekly backups. so I like to manually make a backup when I want to -- particularly if I've just done a lot of data entry work -- than to assume the Time Machine backup will bail me out should I need to go back to it.

Sorry for being so long-winded, but I wanted to try to provide a full explanation and not just say "do xxxx" without explaining why. Hope it helps.
Photo of Digger

Digger

  • 350 Points 250 badge 2x thumb
Very well explained. I too in the past have opened a numbered backup file after the working file was corrupted, then found my numbered backups with the 33, 43, 53 etc prefixes. Now I know why.
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 303,410 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
BTW, QM2007 cannot handle file names longer than 32 chars, including the 5 char extension (.qdfm). I have not examined your situation closely but you need to make sure this is not a factor. 

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)
Photo of Scott Schmidt

Scott Schmidt

  • 972 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
It's not automatic - you need to go Finder/Services to initiate, but it's still easier than manually copying the file straight in the Finder.  Cheers!
Photo of tmplee

tmplee

  • 1,062 Points 1k badge 2x thumb
 jacobs, do you expect the Quicken team to announce in some fashion when they think they've incorporated all the (important?)  features of QM2007 that are still missing from "new" Quicken?
Photo of jacobs

jacobs, SuperUser

  • 108,050 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
It's an interesting question, but my guess would be no -- for a few reasons. Most importantly, they will probably never replicate 100% of the functionality of Quicken 2007. They're aiming to get pretty close, but I expect there are some small things they just never aim to tackle, and perhaps that people don't even care about any longer. Some things just work differently in the new version -- not necessarily worse, but different -- yet some user will say they want the option to do it the old way, and they just aren't going to do it if isn't a widespread user concern. (Just to pick a rather trivial example, there was a Move Transaction command in Quicken 2007 to move a transaction from one account to another. In the modern Quicken, there's no such command, because you can move transactions by simply dragging them into another account int he sidebar. I'm guessing they have no plans to ever add a Move Transaction command, because the modern way of doing it is arguably better, o at least not worse. Yet somewhere out in the user community, there's probably someone who would say the modern Quicken lacks functionality compared to the old Quicken because there's no command to move a transaction.) So they'll never get to 100%. Yet if they proclaim "we're done!" someone will come out and shoot them with an arrow because there's something that isn't done.

And then there are things that are options some users may desire, but aren't absolutely necessary to use the program for the majority of users. Take, for example, the idea of creating a two-line register display like Quicken 2007. Almost no software has the same user interface today that it had 20+ years ago, and the program is usable with the current one-line display -- but for users who are on a small laptop or who like to have two full windows open side-by-side, it's not as easy to use. Some find it manageable but frustrating; others might consider this issue a "show-stopper" that blocks them from upgrading. Will Quicken add this functionality? Perhaps. According to the program manager, it's a significant programming task, because the current transaction register lists are the result of using a lot of built-in functionality in macOS, while creating a two-line display would require much more complex coding from scratch. So this seems somewhat farther down the list of possible enhancements compared to things you simply cannot do in modern Quicken today, and we just don't know when, or if, they will decide this need rises to the top to receive development time.

In reality, software like this is never "done"; it progresses along a continuum, and it's not clear when they can say they've implemented "most" of the features of Quicken 2007. Is it when they're at 95% of Quicken 2007 features? 97%? 99%? I'd guess they don't even have a complete list of specific Quicken 2007 features; more likely, they have lists of features they and users want to add which are periodically re-prioritized based on a variety of factors.

The other problem is that what's missing to one person is irrelevant or unimportant to another, and visa versa. You might be hung up by the inability to do certain Quicken 2007 reports, while I might say the reports are good enough for my needs. And I might say I can't stand the absence of QuickMath, and you might say you never used it and don't care. So "done" or "done enough" is relative for each user. So what I think they'll continue to do is work on new features they know users want, and roll them out as soon as they're able. And longtime Quicken 2007 users who have yet to make the switch will just need to check in from time to time to see if they still have "show-stopper" issues that truly prevent them from upgrading.

I've been actively involved in testing the modern Quicken Mac since its first beta versions more than four and a half years ago, but I continue to use Quicken 2007. I've recently decided I'm going to make the switch this winter; I'm increasingly having problems with Quicken 2007 database corruption and my transaction file completely filling up, and my list of objections to the modern Quicken has been shrinking. There are still a few key things I will sorely miss from Quicken 2007, and I hope they'll come soon to the new program, but I think I can now reasonably make the switch. I understand that some Quicken 2007 users are still holding out for one or more key features before they'll feel able to switch, as each of our needs are different.
Photo of tmplee

tmplee

  • 1,062 Points 1k badge 2x thumb
Thanks.  That's a very well written discussion of the issue and I'm guessing if I had the experience with "new" Quicken you do I'd have written something similar.  It is probably time to dive in and see what the water's like.  I had hoped to be able to postpone that until after this tax season, but may not be able to.  Our stock broker, with our blessing, just split an investment account that had been a single "managed account" (an outside service manages all the buys and sells) into two accounts, by taking about a third of what was in it and handing that over to another manager (with different goals.)  That involves selling a third of each of 22 securities and buying 77 almost entirely new securities.  When we're done with that our Quicken 2007 will be handling nearly 200 stocks and mutual funds, in three different accounts.  I have no idea if it's going to be up to the task!  Usually entering the buys and sells and dividends on a day-by-day basis is not much of a burden, but so many all at once is quite a task.  (I don't trust downloading transactions from our financial institutions since I have no idea what's going on, so we do it all manually.)
(Edited)
Photo of smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92)

smayer97 (QM2007, CDN user since '92), SuperUser

  • 303,410 Points 100k badge 2x thumb
To help you in that decision making and be sure to understand if it will meet your needs, you can read a lot more about the differences here:
https://getsatisfaction.com/quickencommunity/topics/quicken-for-mac-2018-or-qm2007

(If you find this reply helpful, please be sure to click "Like", so others will know, thanks.)