Quicken in OneDrive

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Because I have grown to employ Quicken for all my financial bookkeeping, I am employing desktop quicken with database resident on OneDrive. 

Note: This conversation was created from a reply on: quicken online web interface.
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William Oldaker

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Posted 5 months ago

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splasher, SuperUser

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I don't see a question.
You are skating on thin ice if you are keeping your Quicken data file on a network drive.  Quicken does not support it due to the high number of reads and writes and the increased chance of data file corruption.
I hope you make routine backups of your data file on removable media.
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jacobs, SuperUser

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I haven't worked with OneDrive, but generally, Quicken for Mac is not supported for use on cloud-based drives. Cloud drive are fine for storing backup copies, but should not be used to open the live data files. If OneDrive copies your entire data file to your hard drive when you open it, and copies it back when you're done, that might work, but it still opens you to possible problems.

The issue is that the Quicken data file is a Mac "package" -- a folder of many folders and files inside a wrapper which makes it appear to be a single file. There have been problems over the years with file permission problems developing when the data file is moved around, and people get locked out of their data. It doesn't happen often, but if it happens to you, you don't care that it works 99% of the time!
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UKR, SuperUser

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As to Quicken for Windows:
The same applies ... Quicken is not supported for use with cloud backup software directly accessing the active Quicken data file. Here's why:

When you start a manual backup process from within Quicken, one of the first things that happens is: Quicken closes the data file to ensure that all updates have been written. A split second later it opens the file again to start the Backup process.

A third party cloud backup product like Dropbox, Carbonite, One Drive, etc. or a NAS backup server will use that "file close" command as the trigger to start its own backup process ... and that gets in the way of Quicken trying to reopen the file for backup ...

If you are using any of these cloud backup products you need to configure them so as NOT to backup your current Quicken data file. Make it use either the Automatic Backup file or the Manual Backup file.

The recommended location for your active Quicken data file is on your internal hard drive or SSD in the folder \Documents\Quicken

Using Carbonite, OneDrive, Dropbox, etc. as the Backup process

(For this discussion, Carbonite is assumed to be the backup product in effect. Replace "Carbonite" with the name of your backup tool.)

IMHO, you should keep Carbonite (or any other third party backup product which you use) away from your live Quicken data file. It may interfere with some Quicken operations, especially Manual Backup.

Instead, configure Carbonite to backup either of these files:
- The backup file created by Quicken Automatic Backup
Or
- The backup file created by Quicken Manual Backup as you close Quicken.

Backup settings in Quicken are stored in Edit / Preferences / Backup.

If you choose the Automatic Backup file as Carbonite candidate (or even if you don't), activate this process and set it to execute every "1" times Quicken closes. The Automatic Backup file always goes to a \Backup folder that's part of the folder which contains your current Quicken data file, usually \Documents\Quicken\Backup

If you choose the Manual Backup file as Carbonite candidate, create a separate
\Quicken\Carbonite_Backup folder and direct the Manual Backups to go there every "1" times Quicken closes. Select the "Add date stamp to file name option" so you get multiple backups and not just one that is overwritten every time.

For a belts and suspenders approach:

Automatic Backups go to Carbonite, Manual Backups go to a USB stick or external hard drive.

One can never have enough backups of your Quicken data file. BTDTGTS!

Note: It's been brought to my attention that some versions of Quicken may not start the backup process upon close if you close Quicken by any command other than clicking the (used to be red) "X".

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William Oldaker

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Reading the authortative comment regarding cloud-based files, as I read it the major risk is more than one computer simutainously accessing the files.  Given that I am the only user and only use one computer at a time, it would appear to minimize the risk.  I use my Xeon desktop at home and a notebook when traveling. 

But I get the point and I will change my strategy store the datafile on the cloud and download to local machine for actual use.    
And yes I backup local files when closing Quicken and backup database and the backup files every night
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Ray Cosner

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I use Quicken with OneDrive.  The way it works, OneDrive keeps copies of the file both on your hard drive and in the cloud.  Unless you override the OneDrive defaults, Quicken is actually working with the local file.  When you close that file at the end of a session, OneDrive then updates the cloud copy and then updates from the cloud the local file on any other computers that are tied to the same OneDrive user account.

Never had any problems with this in 4-5 years of near-daily use of Quicken.  The only thing to keep in mind, your other computer using the same file via OneDrive may not have an updated file for a couple minutes, depending on the size of your Quicken file and the speed of your internet connection.  Of course the update of your other computer(s) will only happen if the other computer is running, otherwise, the files will sync after the next time it is started.
(Edited)
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Willowgate

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My experience is exactly the same with OneDrive.  I have been doing this for about 4 years with Quicken Home & Business.  No issues.
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jacobs, SuperUser

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Ray, I don’t know if you’re using Mac or Windows, but the key is to make sure you QUIT Quicken to trigger the backup. As UKR explains above, the internal Quicken backup can close the data file briefly to make a backup, but reopen it almost immediately; if Quicken reopens while OneDrive is working on the file bad things could happen. Probably won’t most of the time, but could.

And for Quicken Mac, compressing your backups (making them .zip files), either manually or using the built-in backup, protects against permission problems inside the Quicken data file package which can occur if you are moving a standard, unzipped Quicken data file. Again, it doesn’t happen often, but if it does, you’re outta luck.
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Ray Cosner

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Using Windows 10.  You are right, the sync process won't start until you no longer have Quicken open with that file.  If you leave Quicken open for days, the sync will be delayed accordingly.

I have never had any problem such as you describe.  Does Quicken actually close the primary data file while it is being copied for backup?

Not sure if this proves anything, but...    I also have Quicken set up to put its backups on OneDrive.  I have noticed that OneDrive consistently queues the primary file to upload first, followed by the backup file.
(Edited)
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splasher, SuperUser

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Does Quicken actually close the primary data file while it is being copied for backup?
Yes, it does that to make sure that all reads/writes are complete.  If the 3rd party program reacts quick enough, it prevents Quicken from re-opening the file after the backup is complete.  There are many posts on this forum reporting that programs like Carbonite or some other cloud backup system causing the issue.
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Robert Jarrett

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Has anyone who is using Quicken 2018 on OneDrive (Ray?) seen a recent HORRIBLE degradation in the time it takes to complete an Online Update.  Mine used to take 5 minutes or so, and I could live with that (scheduled updates at 4:00 a.m. though they did not always run).

But over the last 2 weeks, while on vacation, I've noticed that it now takes almost 30 minutes to complete the Online Update.The 22 accounts download appear to proceed as normal.  The culprit is in the Services Updated.  And the only two I have updating are Quotes and Investing Headlines and Bills Update, which says that not all Bills were update.  I have had a LOT of issues with Q2018 and the Bill Pay process.

It would help to know if I am in the company of others, or my incidence is isolated.

Thank you to the community in advance.

RJ

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Ray Cosner

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I did not see any impact on One Step Update (OSU) running time when I began using OneDrive.  Not sure why you asking me to address this point, since (as I described in my first post above) when Quicken is in use it is working strictly on a local QDF file - unless the user has overridden the OneDrive defaults to make it use the cloud file.  The synchronization via OneDrive with the cloud and with other computers takes place after the Quicken session has been terminated, thus releasing the lock on the QDF file.  This sync is done by transferring the complete QDF file to the cloud and then to other computers tied to the same OneDrive account.  Quicken is not communicating with the OneDrive cloud storage wile Q is active.

Since you specifically asked me to respond, I wonder if you're using OneDrive and have set it to use the cloud file (overriding the defaults)?  That certainly seems like it could be a big performance impact in both OSU and in manual data entry, and it raises the possibility (likelihood) of data corruption which was discussed earlier in this thread.

With OSU, I am updating about 10 accounts at two institutions.  I am also updating several dozen investment quotes, currency exchange rates, news, and other items.  It takes a couple minutes.  It got quicker when I disabled the online bills update, motivated by recent posts regarding the R10.10 update.  I did not measure the speedup, but it certainly felt much quicker.  These timings are on a 24 Mb/s internet connection, on an 8-year-old desktop computer.  Not exactly state of the art, but those are my timings.

OSU did slow down appreciably (had been about 30 sec) when I updated to the Quicken 2018 version last October.  At that time, I also began using the online bills update, and I attribute the slowdown to that.  I was updating bills from about a dozen places, but I stopped that a few days ago.
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William Oldaker

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As it turns out, I too am employing Quicken Home, Business, & Rental Property using a local image of QDF file linked to default OneDrive image.  And since I removed the Online Bills, Update processing is very quick.

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