What heart rates correspond to the effort fractions in the workouts?

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  • Updated 3 years ago
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I'm used to working with a percentage of maximum hear rate rather than the out of ten perception of effort. Do the fractions convert to a heart rate zone?
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Oliver Wright

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  • confused

Posted 4 years ago

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David McQuillen, Company Admin

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Hi Oliver! Great question. I like to use RPE (recommended perceived exertion), rather than power or HR, for the video instructions as it allows people to gauge their own effort in a very personal way.

Although you should only consider the following as general guides, here are some sites that 'convert' RPE into HR Zones. Keep in mind that the RPEs listed in the videos are only suggestions - if you find that you can't sustain the effort, then back off (or if you think I'm going to easy on you, by all means ramp up that suffering!).

Here are the sites:

-- Nice converstion table: http://www.cardiacathletes.org.uk/cal...
-- Explanation of various HR/RPE concepts: http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/f...
-- Another table: http://trituna.blogspot.com/2007/02/h...

If anyone else has some thoughts on RPE and HR, please post them here!
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Steve Taylor

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I use my HR zones X2. So when we are busting ass climbing Alp D'Huez, I am in my 4.5-5 HR zone. If we are cruising along @ a 6 on the video, I am trying to stay in HR zone 3. I feel I get a more consistent effort that way as opposed to RPE. My RPE on the last 15 minutes of Angels will be considerably different if I did Fight Club and Revolver first.
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Jon MacKinnon

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This is exactly how I ride.
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Jason Mellet

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i find that RPE works fine for me, im not that clued up on HR zones yet so that works well for me.
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George Lupton

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I would go for something along the lines of finding out your max heart rate, subtracting your resting heart rate from that and dividing what's left by 10. Then to get between levels of RPE add one lot of what ever number you got above to your resting heart rate. i.e. if your MHR is 200 and resting is 50 then, 3 = 95, 5 = 125, 7 = 155, 9 = 185 etc. Sound reasonable?
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Oliver Wright

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Thanks everyone - all makes sense now. Time for some controlled suffering rather than just eyeballs out and breathing through my ears for the whole workout.
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djcarruthers

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I think its best not to be too controlled. You need to listen to your body and push it to it's max each time you are supposed to do 9/10 or 10/10
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John Hess

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I agree that RPE is a better gauge of effort than heart rate. The older you get the less useful heart rate is to measure your effort and many other factors, including hydration, temperature and others, in addition to the work you're doing affect heart rate. Best of all is a power meter.
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wormscoffer

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Heart rate has it's place in training but one really needs to have a handle on perceived effort as well. Heart rate readings can be useful for some training and also for other indicators - such as a higher heart rate for the same perceived effort or power output suggest impending illness or over training.

For short intervals, heart rate is of less use. In a 60 second interval your heart rate can be climbing the whole interval so you'll not reach the target HR till near the end and how soon depends on your effort. No doubt someone will soon bring out an HR monitor displaying rate of increase in the not too distant future.

I find the most useful application of heart rate readings is recovery, not just after exercise but during. In my long distance MTB rides the ability to reduce your heart rate between hills but still maintain drive is what results in improved performance.

I'm not an expert by any means so the above is just my opinion.
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Jon MacKinnon

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I agree that for short intervals heart rate is kind of useless, however I know that 80RPM in 50*11 on my turbo will get me into zone 5, so when I see GO come up I shift to 50*11 and ride at 80RPM for the time stated. Although it's not going to put me into that zone for the short amount of time I have to ride for (downward spiral is a perfect example), if I were to stay at that effort for a minute or so, it would. That's the way I ride anyway, as I figure that you're supposed to be riding at the effort 10/10, and that's the gearing i'd be riding in if I wanted to hit that HR zone.
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Andrew L Folpe

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I'll use HR along with RPE if all I have is a HRM (like on a spinning bike at the gym)- I find it helpful to have some objective data, just in case I'm slacking on RPE.

I'm more interested in how to use power as the variable with the videos. I've been trying to figure out which percentages of my CTS field test numbers to use for the RPE numbers. 9 and 10 are simple- I just try for absolute max watts. I've been thinking of anything below 5 as "endurance", 6 as "tempo", 7 as "steady state" and 8 as "climbing repeat".

Curious what other people are doing.
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Alasdair McGill

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does anyone use power when working out on these sessions? When it mentions your TT effort, I'm using my 40km FTP - is that ok? I can pretty much gauge everything else from that.

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Power zones.
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h.rumpole

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That's how I use it, and it seems to work perfectly. 7=FTP.8=v02. 10=i want my mommy.
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jsiegs

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I just started with a video last night. I was wondering the same thing to convert the 1-10 to power numbers. I thought that an 8 was "TT" effort, or what I took to be 100% CP (or FTP, threshold, whatever you want to call it). My V02/20 MP at last test was about 124% CP, I'd have put that at about a 9. Somewhat arbitrarily I called 7.5=90-95% CP, 7=80-85% CP, 6 70-75%. Does that seem reasonable? It conflicts with the previous response about 7=FTP/CP.
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h.rumpole

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Guess it depends on which zones you're using and where they start. I was just going based on the ones in Coggan's book, so VO2 (zone 5) starts at 106% FTP. Then 9 becomes anaerobic, and 10 becomes neuromuscular (z7).