Make HTML Editable W/out Advanced Templates

  • Idea
  • Updated 2 years ago
  • Planned
I've talked to some people at Typepad about this idea already, but I guess I'll give it again here. I think there should be some feature in Typepad that allows users to directly edit the HTML-without switching to Advanced Templates. When you switch to Advanced Templates, all your prior design changes are completely lost and you have to start from scratch adding code (which I don't know how to do). There's sometimes some really great thing I find online for my blog-but it requires you to add code in a specific part of your blog. I am mainly looking at customizing my post footers using some code. Blogger has this feature for FREE, while I'm paying Typepad nearly $200 without this feature. Either make HTML editable, OR make Advanced Templates a lot easier to use somehow. Tell me what you think.

-Cosmo

  • 27 Posts
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  • sort of angry?

Posted 5 years ago

ClassicalBookworm

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I'd be happy just to be able to add code to the head section. It would help with various widgets and other fun things like georeferencing. Page footers would be nice too.

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right right. Yeah I would like to make the banner editable too, not just add an image. To put ads there would be very useful. Forgot about that.

miz_ginevra

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ITA with Colleen - if you've got a list of these sort of things you wish were editable, I'd be fascinated to see it.

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Hi Ginerva. I'd like to see a section for the blog overall where I can put in tracking codes for other sites without having to make a page, code for the header, code for the footer, post footer, anything else? Also, see my other idea about typelists for header and footer. It's a good idea.

Colleen, Typepad Community & Support

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Cosmo, we've heard from tons of users about this specific idea and I know our development team is working on enhancing how page elements can be edited without having to get into the template code.

Can you give us some feedback on how you see this in your head? Are these changes you'd make while viewing the blog itself, or from the Weblogs > Design area?

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what do you mean "viewing the blog itself?" Now that I think of it, having something like Blogger where it just says Here, edit your code is a bad idea. Most of us don't know where to look. Coding is very complicated. What if there was something where each part of your blog (header, footer, overall design, etc) in the Design section has an editable text box containing the code. There should be something on the side that tells users EXACTLY what each piece of code does, how to change it, and how to add code. Like it?

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Lot's of typepad users unfamiliar with html are losing out on income if they can't support the all the six apart ads on their site. Not being able to use the 728X90 ads at the top means the side bars get cluttered with ads. I'm at the point where I will have to switch to blogger or a wordpress theme as the advanced templates system is just too advanced for me. Please do something, as I love typepad and think it is a great service.

ClassicalBookworm

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I second that. Plus a section to add code to the <head> area (which is not the same thing as the graphical page header). It might also be good to direct users to sites that can validate custom code. Either that or a strict requirement to preview the changes first to make sure the page doesn't blow up.

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@Ben Cohen
I completely agree. My sidebar is loaded with ads from Adify and it looks way too flashy. It would be awesome to have them in the header or footer.

miz_ginevra

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We're still working on this one and should have it ready soon. If you're not already in beta, you should sign up to get a sneak peek.

http://beta.typepad.com/

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Tried to apply to beta, but haven't been accepted (at least I don't think so). When will this be ready? I'm building a blog network, so need to have the top space available for ads. It's pretty urgent!!!

Colleen, Typepad Community & Support

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Ben, if you let us know the URL for your blog, we can look at moving your account to the beta platform.

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Hi Colleen - the typepad url is: www.benfu1.typepad.com (www.thedailybanter.com).
Thanks so much!

Colleen, Typepad Community & Support

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Thanks for that info. I opened a help ticket with steps to get you started. Please reply there if you have any questions :)

Cyn McCrackan, Champion

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Just wanted to add that I may be missing this but without knowing CSS but being able to manipulate HTML (as in banners) can I now put a 728X90 ad at the top of my "Plus" TypePad blog?
This is really important to me as well in terms of keeping the blog viable. I hate to clutter up the sidebars with ads plus the advertisers want that top position for premium ads.

Thanks!

robert phillips

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I see this topic has been inactive for a year. I'm fairly new to Typepad, but NOT new at all to html and css.

Is it still in progress? Available on the beta?

Alex Sirota, Champion

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Not sure how far this went other than using the Embed your own HTML widget inside of the Design view, which is great. There are many ways to integrate HTML and CSS into a regular TypePad template without going into advanced.

I've used the following methods:

- navigation bar "advanced" mode
- typelists Note option
- Embed your own HTML widget
- customizing CSS

Each has their own benefit and draw back. Most people who go to Advanced templates regret their actions. The reason for this is while the template creation process is really powerful, you essentially have a site that is driven through a custom coded system and each time you make a change to the layout you have to perform open heart surgery on the core way your blog works. This is tempermental and prone to errors. Worst of all it is not easy to experiment. You have to save your templates and make a back up.

So I think the best thing TypePad can do is identify the use cases where a custom HTML is necessary and instead of forcing you to copy and paste widgets which you already do, you create templates that allow you "override" the standard template behavior. Much like the Twitter "override" works when you post a new blog post. That's a great feature because it has such powerful effects in Twitter (hash tags, @ tags) without making your headline look silly.

In the Design tab the times I've needed custom HTML are as follows:

- changing the banner with a picture in each built in template, this is a CSS edit, should be doable from a setting in the template with parameters on the image
- changing the navigation bar
- introducing specific widgets that are popular (the social networks, banner networks)

Doing these things without custom HTML and with easy to use integrations like the Google Analytics setup for example, is the best way you can enable non technical bloggers to take advantage.

Sure you won't have the perfect blog with each pixel being laboriously edited, but you will have a flexible blog. The design editor with the movable drag and drop functions is still the best interface I've seen to make changes and works better than even the WYSIWYG editors I've seen in square space and other systems like that. But here are what many of my websites look like - managing custom areas in the design editors without code is the challenge:



See the typelists with the commented out names -- that's a hack to avoid the typelists from being shown on the page. The effect is extra space and it doesn't always look great or can easily be positioned. Allowing the same interface with a better level of control could be a killer way to avoid advanced templates. In fact, you CAN make advanced templates starting from any standard template, if this editor allowed more flexibility in the placement and editing of these "boxes".

The level of power and control is "good enough" because you can really make trouble when you give newbie users or non technical users too many options.

Melanie, Community Manager

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Alex, thanks again for your input. This is exactly the kind of thing we love to see our bloggers putting to work for them! :D